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Go Back   MacGurus Technical Forums > General Hardware and Software Discussions > Memory and CPU Discussions

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  #1  
Old 02-09-2012, 09:16 PM
subastein subastein is offline
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Default Create a bootable DVD for mac Lion

One of my friends has got his system crashed and unfortunately he has no backup of his OS.

I Learnt a lesson and now I am searching for a Mac application to create a bootable DVD of my Mac Lion.

It would preserve my OS and applications installed in it.


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Old 02-09-2012, 10:26 PM
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In my opinion you should have an internal or external hard drive that is used to clone your boot drive on a regular basis.
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Old 02-10-2012, 06:39 AM
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http://eggfreckles.net/notes/burning-a-lion-boot-disc/


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  #4  
Old 02-10-2012, 07:35 PM
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Yes, Clone the whole system. OS, applications, data, everything.

All you need is a any hard drive big enough to copy your stuff, and a free tool like CarbonCopyCloner.
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  #5  
Old 02-20-2012, 01:45 AM
subastein subastein is offline
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Thanks unclemac.

I got some options to create clone of my Mac. Yes CCC is there along with super Duper and Stellar Drive clone.
In CCC there is an option of Incremental backup. So, does it mean that if I got a file edited wrongly then my original (correct) data would be overwritten in clone also?

So, I feel its not safe. What is your opinion?


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Old 02-20-2012, 12:22 PM
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Right here is Bombich's CCC Page. It describes an incremental backup as...
Quote:
Carbon Copy Cloner offers fast, incremental backups that copy only items that differ from the last backup, as well as checksum analysis of your backed up files, archiving and archive management, and backup task scheduling. With CCC, you can back up to a locally-attached hard drive, to a network volume, or to another Macintosh across your network or across the Internet.


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Old 02-20-2012, 12:41 PM
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No one but Bombich would call that incremental.


CCC, SuperDuper, ChronoSync and a bunch of other backup/copy programs are excellent at what they do. They are not incremental. However they are safe and easy to use as long as you know their weaknesses. ALL backup applications have weaknesses and strengths - knowing those is what makes them safely useable.

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Old 02-20-2012, 12:45 PM
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Sounded better than my thoughts... I don't think it really answered subastein's question to well either.


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  #9  
Old 02-29-2012, 12:42 AM
subastein subastein is offline
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Ok I got what RWM said. The thing you mentioned comes under file level cloning method (If I am not wrong).

But, as per CCC , it follows block level method. .....Confusion

Please elaborate if you have idea about it. I got this from cnet and explicitly mentioned at Stellar drive clone features.


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Old 02-29-2012, 07:58 AM
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I don't have a clue what you are asking. Can you rephrase it?
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  #11  
Old 02-29-2012, 05:16 PM
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I know what's he's asking, I think, but I don't have an answer. Just some observations. File level would copy all files from A to B. Block copy would be copying at the drive format level. Each allocation block would be duplicated on B based on the data from A

I can't see much difference from a users standpoint, though the block level cloning might be a tad faster due to totally avoiding/bypassing any fragmentation on the source drive. You would end up with your copy being fragmented just like your original where with file level cloning though it may take a bit longer you end up with your clone being totally unfragmented. (at least until you start messing with it) Fragmentation really isn't much of an issue these days though and I don't think the speed difference between the two different methods is going to be big enough to become an issue either.
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  #12  
Old 02-29-2012, 10:05 PM
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Block level copying is always faster......but I don't care unless I am imaging a fleet of machines.

File level will always get you a full file defrag. Block level may do that for you......don't know for sure. My hunch was always "no", because the block would be laid down in the exact order as read off the old drive, including file fragmentation.

Anyway, file level is just fine. And key to being able to do incrementals later if you so choose. CCC has changed a bit, but basically, if you are booted to the drive you want to clone, it can only do a file level clone. If you are booted to something else, you have the option to do a block level or file level clone. Again, not a big deal really, regarding the finished product.

----

Yes, CCC can do incremental backups. Most folks tend to use for a full, bootable OS Clone (and may not be aware of its full potential), but it can do much more. They recently added automatic grooming, which looks great, though I have not used it. Yet.

I did not follow the previous question about incrementals.......A clone is a clone. If your primary goal is to have a bootable OS, with all apps installed, registered, and ready....then all you need is a clone, and incrementals. internal HD dies, something gets corrupted or damaged, you can install a new HD, and copy the cloned OS back onto it. Make sense?

Incrementals: Incrementals can be used later to add to a backup, but should still preserve previous versions, as long as you have enough room to keep enough history to get a previous copy of a file. Most useful to protect updated user data, like when you add contacts to Address Book, photos to iPhoto, etc. It's not possible to answer beyond that, because it will always depend on how old a copy you need vs. how many incremental shots there are....often dependent on how much storage space you have.

Some folks simply clone the entire OS on a schedule. If you have room for several clones, you can grab a file from a previous version.

I think CCC is great, solid, and trustworthy. There is a bit of a learning curve beyond a simple clone, but that's true of most back up software.
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  #13  
Old 03-14-2012, 11:58 PM
subastein subastein is offline
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Thank you for describing the terms in detailed way.


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