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Thread: When Sleeping, MacPro Turns Itself Off

  1. #1
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    Default When Sleeping, MacPro Turns Itself Off

    When my MacPro sleeps, it often turns itself off. It seems to be better at actually sleeping if I put it to sleep manually (from the Apple menu) than if I just leave it alone to put itself to sleep after a period of not being used. Even then, it often turns itself off. I updated to Mavericks a few months ago, but I first noticed this problem a few weeks ago. The computer is a MacPro3,1 Early 2008, running Mac OS X 10.9.5 Build 13F1507 (Mavericks).

  2. #2
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    Reset the System Management Controller.

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201295
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  3. #3
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    Default Didn't Work!

    Yesterday after I reset the system management controller, the computer slept correctly, as it occasionally used to by chance; but, overnight, it again shut itself down while sleeping.

  4. #4
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    Sounds like maybe something screwed up in the firmware or hardware. I have never had my MacPro shut itself off. I have never had any Mac shut itself off.

    You might try turning off sleep. I never let my MacPro sleep, none of the MacPros in MacGurus offices ever sleep. At least the test of turning off sleep for a bit will give us more clues.

    Rick
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  5. #5
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    Default Better After DiskWarrior

    With sleep turned off, the Mac ran 24 hours without turning itself off. Bought the update to DiskWarrior today so I could run it (my old version was too old to run), turned sleep back on, and two good things happened: So far, it sleeps correctly, and upon rebooting, it reloads all of its former windows far faster. Even looks different while loading; instead of hammering away one window at a time, apps with many windows to reopen, such as Web browsers, slide in from the side (or some such thing) with all the empty windows ready to be populated. We'll see if my luck holds over the next few days.

    Thank you!

  6. #6
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    Good deal. Glad you got it.

    Rick
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  7. #7
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    Default Still Shutting Off when Attempting Sleep

    Thought I was out of the woods, but not yet. After nearly 24 hours of putting itself to sleep and wakening properly, the MacPro now turned off again, upon my putting it to sleep from the Apple menu. I have turned off a Preference Pane called Shades:

    http://www.charcoaldesign.co.uk/shades

    that is used to dim the display. Whenever the MacPro is turned back on, Shades reverts to darkening the display, even if I had it bright upon attempting sleep. Seems like an odd thing to cause it to turn off, but easy enough to test.

    When attempting sleep makes the computer turn off, the behavior is not as expected. There is no shutdown process (apps don't close; there is no confirming dialog). Then, when it is booted again, everything works as though nothing happened. There are no crash reports automatically presenting themselves (although I have not checked the logs, and am not sure how to). Sometimes (not always!), Web browsers will say they were not shut down correctly. If I then click to reopen pages, it opens two copies of each page. It's as though the shutdown is not properly journaled, or some such thing.

  8. #8
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    Default Shut Down upon Inserting USB Stick

    Ouch! Immediately after posting my last reply, I inserted a flash drive into a USB port on the back of my MacPro, whereupon the machine immediately rebooted itself. (Unlike with the problem with sleep becoming shut-down, I did not have to push the power button; it restarted itself.) Kernal panic? DiskWarrior reports that the startup drive has bad blocks. It is a twin to a 500GB Hitachi Deskstar drive from MacGurus that does not share this problem. Maybe rather than solve this problem, I should wipe the drive, run a secure delete (to assure finding the bad blocks), and reformat.

    Is running a secure delete (repeatedly overwriting the drive with zeros) the best way to find the bad blocks?

    That USB stick has problems. I was inserting it to test it. The Mac shut down instantly. It has not been in the Mac until now, and so did not cause the other shut-downs.

  9. #9
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    A USB device that has a short in it is a known cause of spontaneous shutdowns. That one is easy, toss in trash.

    A single pass of zeroes is a great drive test and will accomplish fixing bad blocks. Definitely.

    You might consider a clean install and see if the problem persists, as a test.

    You might also turn off sleep for a long period of time, and see if the problems go away.
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  10. #10
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    Default Reformatting the Drive

    TechTool and DiskWarrior report bad blocks on the startup disk. Today, the computer refused to start at all until I ran DiskWarrior again. Time to reformat!

    After I reformat, can I continue using the drive, waiting to see if the problem is fixed after the bad blocks have been mapped out; or, does this mean the drive will continue to develop bad blocks, and must be replaced?

  11. #11
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    Default Bad USB Ports Also Cause Shutdowns?

    Quote Originally Posted by ricks View Post
    A USB device that has a short in it is a known cause of spontaneous shutdowns.
    Suppose that, in addition to a known bad USB stick, one of the USB ports on the Mac was also bad. Could that cause the shutdowns? I have wondered whether one of them did not work consistently correctly.

  12. #12
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    Default DiskWarrior vs. TechTool on Bad Blocks

    DiskWarrior 5.0 reports that several of the drives connected to this computer have bad blocks, including the boot drive. TechTool Pro 8.0.3 disagrees. Run its surface scan tool, and it reports that all drives are 100% fine, with not a single bad block. What should I make of that? Reformatting and installing a clean OS could only help the immediate problem, yet I'm freaked to see two supposedly good utilities disagree.

    I'm inclined to favor DiskWarrior, because years ago, my computer died after allowing TechTool to rebuild its directory, and then worked again after DiskWarrior corrected TechTool's errors. Does anyone have current knowledge of which, or neither, utility to trust?

  13. #13
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    Never found a use for Techtool. Disk Warrior repairs directories, is not perfect at determining a failed drive. No tool is perfect at that. Zero erase test and see if the drive works afterwards.

    USB can cause shutdowns, so I guess a bad port could as well.

    Rick
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  14. #14
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    If the drive is more than about 3 years old....consider replacing it.

    Often bad blocks are the beginning of the end of a spinning HD. Why go through it again in the near future?
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

  15. #15
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    Default Shuts Down Even When Not Booted From the Bad Drive

    While booted from a USB rescue drive, and in the process of copying the data on the bad drive to a disk image, the Mac shut itself down while sleeping! The rescue drive was made from files copied from the bad drive, so this maybe this should be expected. Still, could bad hardware cause this?

  16. #16
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    Turn sleep off.


    Yes, weird shit can be caused by hardware. More likely to be something funky in firmware or software. But yes, hardware can cause literally anything. Tough part is proving what the problem is..
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  17. #17
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    Default Backup the Recovery Partition Separately?

    Progress! Used SuperDuper! to create a disk image backup of the startup volume with the bad blocks. Before I erase the disk, do I need to separately backup the Mac OS X recovery partition, or is it already backed up with the disk image of the startup volume? How?

    Alternatively, if things go wrong, I have the Mac OS X 10.5.2 installer disk that came with the computer, and also a Snow Leopard 10.6.3 installer DVD. I would think the best solution would be to download and install the latest OS, rather than install an old one, and then apply many upgrades.

  18. #18
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    Ignore recovery partition.
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  19. #19
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    FYI: On newer OSes, you can still "recover" via the internet, even without the recovery partition. Just slower.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

  20. #20
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    Default Confirming Good Hardware, Bad Software

    I set the MacPro to never sleep, and left it running for two days, or is it three now, non-stop. No problem! The hardware is fine, but the software is florfed, turning off when it means to sleep. Time for a clean install.

    My laptop can be upgraded to install over the Internet by flashing a new ROM, but the MacPro is too old.

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