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Thread: Cuda

  1. #121
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    1hr N/W of LA LA Land
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    Default

    A pair of surgical tweezers is quite handy when doing jumpers. They don't have to be zircon encrusted, but that can only help. These days I'd need my cheater glasses as well. Getting old sucks, but it beats the alternative.

    Most drives have a jumper guide on the label, and it's a good idea to save jumpers off old drives since some of 'em are slightly different from one another.

  2. #122
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
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    NW Montana
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    This is the SCSI hard drive i have

    http://www.seagate.com/staticfiles/m...ta_jumpers.pdf
    The first drive is an ATA Drive.
    Right under that s Quantum Fireball with SCSI ID settings.

    There will be tiny wires with a small thingy called a "jumper" that connects two wires.. Figure what ID you are using and set the jumpers.

    What is a jumper?
    Take a look here.

    Ask Google

  3. #123
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    NW Montana
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    8,197

    Default It might not line up right... read and learn

    How do I change the SCSI ID on my internal HD? -- borrowed and changed.,.

    While the position of the jumpers varies from drive to drive, there is a basic pattern to the way jumpers are configured. (To find the specific location of the SCSI ID jumpers on your HD, check the manufacturer's web site.) The table below is the typical way hard disk manufacturers set the SCSI ID. Three jumpers, called J0, J1, and J2 here (though they likely aren't labeled on the HD) are used to set the SCSI ID.

    Table did not format right sorry

    J0 J1 J2 SCSI ID
    3 usually reserved for
    7 (reserved for motherboard)

    Some (though not many) manufacturers used a decimal jumper system, with the jumpers representing 1, 2, and 3 (instead of 1, 2, and 4). The jumpers sum to the SCSI ID just as they do above. The only advantage of this system is it makes it impossible to select SCSI ID 7, which is reserved for the Mac motherboard. However, the binary system makes more sense in the context of computers and is by far the dominant method of setting SCSI IDs.


    You got to read and study this maybe ask another forum they might have a better idea of how to tell or teach you.

    Try the ID 4 or 5 nothing should be there and 0, 3 and 7 are probably in use - best guess.

  4. #124
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    Jan 2002
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    NW Montana
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    Read some of this maybe... click in the photo it will blow-up larger and you can see one type or style of a HD Jumper...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumper_(computing)#Design

  5. #125
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    80

    Default

    Many thanks RWM.

    I did the google thing but never came up with the web pages you have directed me to read.

    I certainly am getting a better understanding thanks to you Sir.

    Meanwhile, lots to read and digest.

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