Results 1 to 20 of 31

Thread: Permissions nightmare

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Albury, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    135

    Default Permissions nightmare

    Hi all,
    I moved 2 drives from a dead MDDg4 into an older but working g4. One drive had the OS 10.5.8 & the other all my files on a mac partition & several YDL partitions. I cannot access files even though I have the same OS & passwords. In the "Get Info" all the controls are greyed out. I have searched the internet for weeks now but can't find a solution.

    I can't copy or backup the files & disk utility can't repair the disk. How can I change permissions to get access??

    Here is some info from a suggested terminal operation. I hope it makes sense to someone!

    Last login: Wed Nov 10 21:50:17 on console
    MDD-Mac-8:~ fudgie$ sudo chmod g+w .
    Password:
    MDD-Mac-8:~ fudgie$ ls -la / | head -5
    total 46445
    drwxrwxr-t 40 root admin 1428 11 Jun 20:27 .
    drwxrwxr-t 40 root admin 1428 11 Jun 20:27 ..
    -rw-r--r-- 1 fudgie admin 6148 24 Jul 10:20 .DS_Store
    drwx------ 3 root staff 102 29 Apr 2011 .Spotlight-V100
    MDD-Mac-8:~ fudgie$

    Thanks!
    The Meek Won't Want It!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    on the landline, Mr. Smith
    Posts
    7,787

    Default

    A little more info please, and we should be able to sort this out.

    1. The drives you moved.....unchanged since they got pulled?
    2. You are not booting to the drives, just trying to access them correct?
    3. The 2 drives were originally boot drives, but now you just want to use them to access file and/or for storage?
    4. If that is all true, how are you accessing them? Installed in the machine, or externally via firewire or USB?
    5. If you do a Get Info on the 2 drives, do you see a check box that says "Ignore privileges on this volume" anywhere?


    If yes, check it, and try again.....if not: A quick shortcut that can sometimes resolve this. You can create the same (exact) user on the new machine as was used on the old. Follow this scenario:

    Machine 1 = user is Bill
    Machine 2 = user is Ted

    Move a HD from machine 1 to machine 2. Still boot normally to machine 2, log in as Ted. Can't access Bill's stuff....cause you are not Bill.

    While logged in as Ted on machine 2, open system preferences, and create a new user named Bill (keep in mind it must exactly match the user name from machine 1, and is case sensitive. Now, log into machine 2 as Bill, and you may be able to access Bill's stuff.

    ---

    Next Steps

    There are several other ways to handle this. Permissions can be quite tricky, and are more complex than they appear. One key point is that one must have access to an enclosing directory (folder), and the files or folders you actually want to open or copy. Folders nest inside of folders....it gets deep.

    The following assumes you want access to the files/folders/data while on the machine you are working on....but don't mind or need to get access on another machine......like say the original. So, essentially you are permanently taking control of files, with no need to open them again on the original machine with the original account.

    .....Have to run, will check back tomorrow.
    Last edited by unclemac; 08-11-2013 at 12:02 AM.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Albury, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    135

    Default

    1. The drives you moved.....unchanged since they got pulled

    The Files drive - have written one or two pdf's to it to see if it worked and it did.

    1. You are not booting to the drives, just trying to access them correct?

    One drive I boot to and all is well. The other is the problem.

    1. The 2 drives were originally boot drives, but now you just want to use them to access file and/or for storage?

    No. Just one boot drive as above but! There are still several linux (YDL) partitions on the Files drive as the old'dead machine was a dual boot.

    1. If that is all true, how are you accessing them? Installed in the machine, or externally via firewire or USB?

    Both drives installed in the machine. Problem "Files" drive is ata, the OK boot drive is SATA.

    1. If you do a Get Info on the 2 drives, do you see a check box that says "Ignore privileges on this volume" anywhere?

    Yes, but "greyed out" on Files drive. Is not there on boot drive.
    The Meek Won't Want It!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Albury, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    135

    Default

    & yes to your last paragraph.. the old machine is dead & buried.
    The Meek Won't Want It!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    on the landline, Mr. Smith
    Posts
    7,787

    Default

    OK, so....for the Mac partitions, we can tweak permissions.

    For the Linux partitions.....I hope we can tweak permissions, but it may depend on the file system (how the volume was formatted). Linux flavors are all POSIX based permissions systems, but I don't know about format compatibility. May have to do some investigation....dont see anything here that is a deal breaker.

    Lots of ways to tweak permissions. Since you run YDL, you are not scared of CLI. I prefer a GUI if I can get it. For this scenario, I would recommend using batchmod for 10.5.

    The following changes permissions so that any admin user account has full access to the entire user director that you change. Very handy, simplifies if you use multiple accounts or boot drives/computers. It does however, allow all admin user accounts full access, so much less secure. This is why Apple and all other flavors of Unix/Linux do not allow this by default.... The goal here is to change the Group, not the Owner. If you proceed, just remember that the only user accounts that cannot access the data will be non-admin accounts. You can always un-do this later, or consolidate data, and delete accounts to restore security.

    1. Download and unpack the application.
    2. Open it up, and navigate to the user folder that contains the file you want; Select the user folder in question (either use the File.. button or drag the folder to the path box).
    3. Change the Group to admin (from the very large pull down list), and set the check boxes for full access for Group (check: read, write, and execute) plus options, plus Apply to enclosed folders and files. Should look like this, with your own Owner:
      .
    4. Verify all boxes are checked, and click Apply.
    5. The process can take a while, depending on the directory size. Let it chug away until complete.
    6. Once complete, log out and back in (or restart) to reset the Finder, and test access from your preferred admin account.
    7. If successful, repeat the steps for other user accounts you want to access.



    Once this is done, from any admin account, you should have full access. One glitch is that to get the Finder icons to properly update (so you correctly do not see the little prohibit/locked folder icons), it is easiest to log out and back in once you are done with the above.

    I suspect this will work on the Linux partitions too......but like I said, it is possible that there may file system issues too, beyond permissions. Don't know for sure.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Albury, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    135

    Confused

    Unfortunately this has not worked. I followed the procedure with a folder and then with an individual file but they remain exactly as they were.

    The Meek Won't Want It!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •