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Thread: Green drives

  1. #1
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    Angry Green drives

    When the 5900rpm green drives first came out I had a need for cool and quiet and bought several

    They are dying prematurely. The 1.5TB drives are still running but the 2TB drives.. well 2 have died (a while ago) and a third is going down fast now that I actually started using it on a regular basis. Out of 4 2TB drives this leaves one still running and it gets only sporadic use.

    Have the green drives gotten any better? Was it just the 2TB?

    Is this a safe drive to buy

    ST2000DM001 - Seagate Barracuda 7200.14 2 TB SATAIII 64 MB cache
    Damien,

  2. #2
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    While we did had some good results with the Seagate Green 2TB. Those are the only ones we ever carried and even they had a little bit higher failure rate than other non green drives. It quickly became apparent that in general, green drives suck. Not only a higher failure rate, much much higher in Western Digital's case, but the functions that make the drive 'green' are things that are inimical to reliability. The drive does its own spin down. This can cause all sorts of strange behaviors, especially in RAID. And in the end, what everyone notices are the high failure rates. Rightly so.

    The model 14 and model 15 drives are the best ever from Seagate. Least amount of trouble. Seagate is going to stop advertising RPM. The new 4TB HDD15 is, from what I hear, a 5900 RPM drive. The .14 is no longer a Barracuda, and is no longer the 7200.14, even though it still spins at 7200. I don't know whether that means Seagate will go to a variable speed and hence the deletion of speed based specification, or if Seagate is just going to slow them down. But we'll no longer know how fast they are when we buy a desktop drive.

    R
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  3. #3
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    Thumbs up Advertised Drive Speeds...

    Rick,

    Why would they "not" advertise drive speeds? Is this another way to rip customers off, just like us not getting all of our MB's from a new HD? How can corporations get away with stuff like that? Keep up your awesome MacGurus works ! donsonic

  4. #4
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    I think what you will see is that they will advertise thru put speed or maybe bus speed but NOT spindle RPM. Because the green drives when they first came out, got really close to the same thru put at 5900 that the 7200's at the time were getting. So now, if they can get the same data rate at a lower spindle speed they run cooler and last longer and use less power.

    I think I got bit by the early adopter thing but hopefully by now they have the problems I have worked out

    BTW Ricks, remember I told you I finally moved my iTunes music library off the raid and onto a single drive like you always recommend? Well guess which drive I usedů..

    Yeah it died this morning.

    (I have a backupů 2 backups actually)
    Damien,

  5. #5
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    donsonic,

    Don't get upset that you are being shorted. We definitely are getting the MB's we paid for. Drives are EXACTLY the capacity they are advertised as.

    A 1TB drive is exactly 1000000000000 bytes, that number being written as a base 10 number: 1TB, what we are used to seeing and thinking in.

    When a drive is formatted, your computer does so in base 2. A 'kilo' in base 2 is 1024 bytes. In base 2 a TeraByte is 931 GigaBytes. In base 10 that is written as 1000 GigaBytes. They are EXACTLY the same number. There is no shorting, you still get exactly 1000000000000 bytes of storage space, it is just your computer that writes it as a base 2 number: 931 GBs.

    Rick
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  6. #6
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    My 2 cents:

    Consumers are always looking to simplify things. So, 7200 RPM drives are faster than 5400 RPM drives......and I mean faster at reading and writing data, not just spinning faster.

    Except when they are not.

    We tend to put too much importance on some oversimplified specs, so manufactures tend to remove remove specs that don't really show up helpful info.

    If, for example we bought cars based on engine displacement, instead of horsepower, torque, and fuel economy, car makers would likely stop talking about engine size. In this analogy, the consumers usually (rightly) want to know performance and economy specs, and displacement is almost irrelevant.

    Same should be true for hard drives. We should care about and shop on read and write speeds, seek times, and any other measurable performance metric that can help us know what to expect, and thus what to buy......and RPM is less and less important. Having a variable speed HD.......almost makes it useless.
    Last edited by Damien; 05-28-2013 at 04:13 AM.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

  7. #7
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    Anyway the drive that died was an

    Barracuda LP
    ST32000542AS
    Firmware CC34

    I had it for several years of nearly no use (not even on most of the time). Once I put it in daily use it lasted about 2 weeks until it started making the headclangy noise followed by the spinup grunts though there was never any spin down. It would do this occasionally and getting worse until monday when it dismounted itself and then attempted to beat itself to pieces.

    It was 600gigs of iTunes media but I had a backup and another backup so all is well. Up and running again now and I don't have to rebuild a single playlist… yay me
    Damien,

  8. #8
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    The new drive is showing some impressive speeds

    Damien,

  9. #9
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    Numbers like that mean a Seagate 7200.14. Fast.
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  10. #10
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    Here's are some real world approximate numbers.

    a 600GB restore from SATA to Thunderbolt SATA took just a little over an hour. 200GB of that was on a Crucial SSD and 400GB was on a 2.5 inch seagate 500GB ST9500325AS 5400.6. Both on the internal SATA busses of my Mini

    735.63GB completely new Time Machine backup to a firewire 800 SATA drive is half done and has been running 3 hours. Looks like 6 hours total, maybe a few minutes more
    Damien,

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