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Thread: Crashed Drive Won't Mount

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    47

    Default Dead drive PC mount no, logic board swap, partial yes

    Hello,

    It's been a while since I posted. In the interim I tried to mount the dead drive on a PC laptop I borrowed. The Bios there didn't recognize it.

    I had also ordered a logic board replacement as well following the many positive results for this step at the deadhardrive.com forums. (This is a forum for enthusiasts of "out of the box" solutions like board swaps and freezer recovery--a lot of people there swear by both as having saved their data with those people outnumbering the ones who didn't have success via those methods.)

    I gathered that the most important numbers to pay attention to are printed on the underside of the logic board. I also got some helpful advice from a website dedicated to swapping boards: onepcbsolution.com who told me that old drives like mine don't need a firmware transfer along with a logic board swap (newer drives do need this to make the swapped logic board swap viable for data recovery).

    Accordingly, I got an apple branded 27Gb western digital for $23 on e-bay.

    The logic board number is exactly the same as my dead drive:

    WDC 1060-600845-000 REV A.

    The other numbers (please my first post for the dead drive numbers) are also a close match:

    WESTERN DIGITAL 27GB TRIDE 655T0023 WM934004MH83A EIDE HARD DRIVE.

    Made August 25, 1999.
    MDL (Model) is WD273BA-40AK.
    Firmware is CSNBLKMO.

    So I swapped out the logic boards after testing that my 27gb replacement drive was working fine. Then I installed the drive on a Wiebetech Udv4 bare drive connector and connected to the computer from there via firewire. Initially nothing happened, no drive boot up but none of the older logic board problem clicking sounds either.

    I then gave the hard drive a firm knock via my knuckles and presto the drive made normal boot up sounds and was acknowledged by the OSX system as a drive needing formatting. I clicked ignore and then started up disk utilities and saw the drive listed there but the size is incorrect, it is only reported as 96Mb! The drive has not been recognized at all by the system for two months, so this did feel like progress. https://www.macgurus.com/forums/imag...s/rolleyes.gif

    (The so called problem logic board when attached to the known working 27GB drive also did the same-the drive boots up fine, the OSX system wants to format it, and then it is reported as a 96Mb drive in Disk Utilities.)

    I then tried to clone the 20GB problem drive via prosoft's data rescue "expert panel". It erased the target empty drive (a Caldigit) cloned the western Digital drive but then the Caldigit was no longer recognizable by the OSX system till I reformatted and erased the drive. (So the Caldigit didn't like the Data rescue erase step.)

    Just to be sure that the board swap represented some measure of troubleshooting progress, I stuck the swapped original board back on my dead drive. It did not boot up and kept making repetitive clicking sounds like it was trying to start up. I then put the new board on the dead drive and it booted right up again, but as before, isn't recognized as a formatted volume.

    I've now started up the 20gb drive with the "new" logic board four times since last night to use other software like Total recall and Virtual lab for data recovery and it has started up normally but isn't recognized as a pre-formatted volume. (No success via those software applications. Fearing that the drive would be on too long I haven't tried to get Data Rescue II's long form data recovery pane.)

    So this is where things are at the moment.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    265

    Default

    It did not boot up and kept making repetitive clicking sounds like it was trying to start up.
    It will be a minor miracle if you get anything off that drive now. The arm that holds the read/write heads is flicking backwards and forwards, from the outside of the platter to the spindle and more than likely scraping the platters at the same time. Once the heads make contact with the platters they get scratched and unreadable. From what you've said so far, nothing has managed to be read on the disk and I doubt very much now that you ever will. The more you spin it up, the more scratches and the more dust gets created... game over.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    47

    Default it did boot up...

    Hi Macloon,

    Here is the specific quote from my previous post:

    "I then gave the hard drive a firm knock via my knuckles and presto the drive made normal boot up sounds and was acknowledged by the OSX system as a drive needing formatting. I clicked ignore and then started up disk utilities and saw the drive listed there but the size is incorrect, it is only reported as 96Mb!

    The drive has not been recognized at all by the system for two months, so this did feel like progress....I've now started up the 20gb drive with the "new" logic board four times since last night."

    The OS is now acknowledging the presence of the drive but not recognizing it as a previously formatted drive.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Yes, I understood that. The fact is that the drive is NOT being recognised, otherwise it would be reporting correctly the capacity. It would also be recognised as formatted. No doubt this is an interesting exercise, but I think largely that it's futile.

    I've spent the last 10 hours pulling data off a damaged drive only for the drive to lose contact as Data Rescue finished the scans and was pulling off the data. So far it's recovered 230gb, another 290gb to go, but the scan is corrupted and has to be started all over again.
    Why do I bother?

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Grangeville, ID USA
    Posts
    9,119

    Default

    96 MB is a strange number to see. 2 MB, for the onboard cache I could see - or whatever cache that particular drive had. I don't know where the logic is for the 96. Going to have to think on and study on that.

    Rick
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    265

    Default

    The only thing that occurs to me Rick is that is all that can be recognised of the disk. I've had all sorts of corruptions over the years and have seen many different sizes reported, but it's never been an issue because once a drive is dead or dying the only thing that matters is how much can be salvaged. You get the files, one way or another, and once that's done the drive is going in the trash. If you can't get the files then it's going in the trash anyway. Doesn't matter what size it is.
    The one I've been working on for the last 24 hours is cooked, but I've managed to get the data off it using a combination of Diskwarrior, Drive genius and Data Rescue. None of them, on their own, could achieve it. Drive Genius wouldn't see the drive at first. Diskwarrior reported overlapping files and then crapped out after a few hours, Data Rescue had a go at recovering files and then the drive disconnected itself. Once reconnected though I was able to run Drive Genius and spared out 85 bad blocks. Diskwarrior then ran again and had a go at repairing the overlapping files... and failed again, but the next time I ran it the directory was rebuilt and although DW couldn't replace it I was given the preview, from which I've almost completed copying the User's folder - 23gb to go out of 264gb.

    No freezing, no swapping PCBs, just persistence.

    And done.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    47

    Default Re persistence

    Macloon, we are in the same boat with persistence, which in your case is giving some good results. What you wrote is certainly inspirational to me.

    You never know what you are going to get, but there's something to the process and the possibility of a result that keeps the person going. My persistence though may take me up a dead end or it may result in something worthwhile, which if nothing else has already taught me so much about hard drive mechanics.

    The website I found inspirational was started by a guy who persisted and was eventually successful with a logic board swap despite being told it wasn't possible. Inspired by his story other people wrote about how they too had tried and succeeded with a logic board swap or with freezing the drive.

    What I've learnt is that one person's pain is another person's solution and you won't know which until you see it through. So, I'm hoping someone can illuminate me on why the drive is finally being acknowledged by the system after two months but not at it's correct size.

    I did try Data recovery's detailed scan tab and it didn't find anything. Followowing on from Macloon's post I'll see if Drive Genius can recognize the drive now that Disk Utility is actually acknowledging its' presence.
    Last edited by NEPT34; 03-03-2013 at 01:43 AM. Reason: add information

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Until you run a Drive Genius scan it's doubtful that you'll find your answer.
    Since writing the posts above I've had a 17" Macbook Pro with an apparently functioning drive albeit slow and possibly pointing to other issues such as a bad logic board.
    It turns out, after cloning, then initialising the drive and failing to install an OS, several times, running the scan but cancelling it due to lack of time, then having no option but to run it again - 8 hours into a scan that should only take 90 mins or so - and finding that towards the end of the scan, 10 million blocks to go, that it's found 472 bad blocks, and no doubt loads more to come.
    It's unusual to find so many at the end of a scan - it was 80% of the way through when I cancelled it the first time with zero found.

    My bet is that your drive has bad a whole raft of bad blocks in it, most likely in the area or sectors that the drive relies on for functionality rather than storage.

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