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Thread: Mid-2010 Unibody Mac Mini 4,1 fan at maximum speed [broken heat sensor plug]

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    Default Mid-2010 Unibody Mac Mini 4,1 fan at maximum speed [broken heat sensor plug]

    Mid-2010 Unibody Mac Mini 4,1 fan at maximum speed

    After enduring two years of the drive bottleneck of 1.5GB negotiated link speed and nearing max capacity, I decided to replace the original SATA-I Seagate Momentus 5400 drive with a SATA-II Western Digital Scorpio Blue 5400 WD7500BPVT. I've done a fair number of hard drive swaps to earlier Mac Minis, PowerBooks, and MBPs, so I was aware of the care this process requires. Following the procedure in the otherworldcomputing video, I carefully detached the SATA connectors and the heat sensor connectors. Using no more force than was necessary and proceding with care, I nevertheless broke the optical drive heat sensor socket from the logic board at four tiny solder points. I attempted to use non-permanent glue to bring the socket into contact with the raised solder bumps on the logic board, but that didn't work. So I removed the glue and put a small piece of electrical tape around the optical drive SATA connector (so that the cowling would not seat the SATA connecter when reassembled) and I reassembled the Mini with the new drive in place. When I completed the installation and started the Mini, the fan immediately came on at full speed.

    Third party smcFanControl indicates 5500 rpm and a temp of 31 degrees C. System Profiler indicates that the system recognizes that there is NO optical drive. I reopened the Mini and checked that all of the remaining connectors were properly seated. Third party iStat Pro indicates that the heat sensors for all other components are operating correctly and reporting temps between 23C (ambient) and 32C (CPU) including a reported temp of 26C for each of the Western Digital hard drive volumes (indicating that the heat sensor for the hard drive is connected correctly). Apple Hardware Test reports error code 4SNS/1/c0000008: T00P--124, which I interpret as an error related to the optical drive heat sensor.

    The Mac Mini functions perfectly in all respects except the constant fan at 5800 rpm and I have no optical drive (no great loss, there). The Scorpio Blue is much more responsive, everything works and I spend much less time waiting for the spinning beach ball to complete tasks. Third party fan controllers are useless, as they will not lower the speed. Putting the computer to sleep from the Apple menu shuts the fan down completely. Wakeup restarts the fan immediately.

    I've performed the correct sequence for SMC reset, which did not help (SMC Version system is 1.65f2). I've booted into SAFE mode, then restarted normally, which did not help. I've performed a PRAM reset through five startup chimes, no luck. The Mac Mini firmware is up-to-date. I do not have sufficient soldering skill to reattach the heat sensor connector to the motherboard. Is there any way to get the fan from spinning at 5800 rpm? Is my only option a new logic board? Is there any way to get the system to adapt to the absence of the optical drive?

    I used to be a big fan of Apple products, but I'm angry with Apple for (1) selling the 2010 Mini with a hard drive that cripples the negotiated link speed by half, and (2) manufacturing the logic board with connector sockets that pop off at the slightest pressure, making it impossible to upgrade the computer without running the risk of causing severe damage. Planned obsolescence at it's worst. I've seen many reports of the heat sensor sockets being popped off the motherboard, and many reports of the fan running at maximum speed, but I have yet to find a solution. I would have thought that disconnecting the optical drive SATA connector would take the optical drive heat sensor out of the loop. iStat Pro shows no optical drive and reports no optical drive heat reading. System profiler shows no optical drive installed.

    Hardware Overview:
    Model Name: Mac mini
    Model Identifier: Macmini4,1
    Processor Name: Intel Core 2 Duo
    Processor Speed: 2.4 GHz
    Number Of Processors: 1
    Total Number Of Cores: 2
    L2 Cache: 3 MB
    Memory: 8 GB
    Bus Speed: 1.07 GHz
    Boot ROM Version: MM41.0042.B00
    SMC Version (system): 1.65f2

    Disc Burning:
    No disc burning device was found. If the device is external, make sure it’s connected and turned on.

    NVidia MCP89 AHCI:
    Vendor: NVidia
    Product: MCP89 AHCI
    Link Speed: 3 Gigabit
    Negotiated Link Speed: 3 Gigabit
    Description: AHCI Version 1.30 Supported

    WDC WD7500BPVT-00HXZT3:
    Capacity: 750.16 GB (750,156,374,016 bytes)
    Model: WDC WD7500BPVT-00HXZT3
    Revision: 01.01A01
    Serial Number: WD-WXU1CA181923
    Native Command Queuing: Yes
    Queue Depth: 32
    Removable Media: No
    Detachable Drive: No
    BSD Name: disk0
    Rotational Rate: 5400
    Medium Type: Rotational
    Bay Name: Lower
    Partition Map Type: GPT (GUID Partition Table)
    S.M.A.R.T. status: Verified

    I've done an SMC reset in the right order (sequence is critical):
    1. Shut down the computer.
    2. Unplug the computer's power cord and all other cables.
    3. Press and hold the power button for 5 seconds.
    4. Release the power button.
    5. Attach the computers power cable and all other cables.
    6. Press the power button to turn on the computer.

    (If you don't release the power button in step 4 before attaching the power in step 5, then you are doing a PMU reset procedure rather than an SMC reset. But since Intel Minis don't have PMUs, you end up with a high-speed fan as a consequence.)

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    UPDATED: August 2015 - Resolved!


    Macs Fan Control is now mature, runs great on both the Mac OS and Win (bootcamp side) and is still free. And, it supports EVERY model! Get it, use it, love it.

    I use it on Macs that are under heavy load, so I can keep temps lower than default Apple settings....at the cost of a bit of fan noise.
    FWIW, I (and many others) agree.

    Apple has reached, and now stepped over the limit of miniaturization for the sake of sleekness. Things are just too small and too fragile. Your situation is the poster child. Swapping a hard drive should not be so dangerous. Heck, I'll give them the closed back on iOS devices, as they have no moving parts, and failure rate is so low that it is at least arguable that the trade off is right and well balanced.

    Not so with spinning HDs, fans, and other parts that need to be replaced.

    I expect that optical drive or no, the fimware controlling the fans needs every sensor to check in, or it goes into safe mode (high fan) to protect against run away heat. With the LB connector broken, don't know how to calm it down. Even if you slow the fan mechanically, that could be dangerous if the box was under load, and fan needed to be at max rpm.

    I wonder if you can get any relief from SSD fan control? Worth a shot to rule it out....worked over here just the other day, though I did not expect it to. It's clean and simple, and yes, you can turn fans down, unlike most other software solutions. And it can control the optical fan, at least on iMacs. It does install a process that runs via launchd, though in my testing it uses 0.01% CPU and 4MB, so it seems well built and lean, from limited testing.

    Keep us posted, this will likely be a more common occurrence as things continue to shrink.
    Last edited by unclemac; 08-06-2015 at 09:04 AM.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

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    Oh, and though it is a pain, you can try to find a good board repair tech. Cheaper than a new LB, and not much to lose if all other roads are dead ends.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

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    Quote Originally Posted by unclemac View Post
    FWIW, I (and many others) agree.

    I wonder if you can get any relief from SSD fan control? Worth a shot to rule it out....worked over here just the other day, though I did not expect it to. It's clean and simple, and yes, you can turn fans down, unlike most other software solutions. And it can control the optical fan, at least on iMacs. It does install a process that runs via launchd, though in my testing it uses 0.01% CPU and 4MB, so it seems well built and lean, from limited testing.
    Unclemac--Thanks very much for your post. I contacted Exirion, the developer of SSD fan control, who replied that "SSDFC was designed for iMacs and it would be of no use in a Mac Mini." iMacs have multiple fans; MacMinis have but one. It does appear to work well with iMacs, as you mentioned. There seems to be no software fix for this problem in the unibody MacMini. If anyone can post a link to any possible solution, it would be much appreciated. So far, I've been unable to find a repair shop that will take on this miniscule and surgical-solder motherboard repair.

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    Default broken optical drive heat sensor A1347 logic board

    Does anyone have any thoughts on the effect of using copper wire to bridge the two logic board solder bumps for the missing leads to the optical drive heat sensor?

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    Try some of this It's solar cell tab wire. It's basically printed circuit without the board.. imagine if you peeled the silver circuit off the board and that's what this is. Also it is already solder so you will not have to add any solder to it at all.. very nice when working on tiny boards. Further its conductivity is far closer to the actual board than copper wire would be. It's also cheap, under 10$ including shipping for 50 feet. The drawbacks are that you have to buy 50 feet (100pcs 6 inches by 2 mils) and that it isn't insulated.
    Damien,

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    Yeah, I know the SSD fan control software is supposed to only work on iMacs, though it appeared to help a MBP......so I threw it out there as a low risk hail-Mary.

    I installed it (on a iMac with no issues) and it has an interface for both the HD and optical fan, and as you know the Mini only has one fan, so I would assume Mini firmware is looking for temps from both OD and HD, and controlling one fan for both temps. So, in your shoes, I would try it. Nothing to lose.

    The other tool out there that can actually slow fans down through software is HD Fan Control. Appears to work in a similar way, and designed specifically for the iMac HD firmware issue......but, why not see if it has any effect?

    Damien: Cool stuff. Thanks!
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

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    Default Successfully reduced fan speed in 2010 MacMini

    Unclemac, Damien, Thanks so much for your input and great advice! I installed SSD Fan Control from exirion.net and can report that it does work in my mid-2010 Unibody MacMini. Since it's designed for the two-fan iMac, it gives an erroneous reading for the hard drive fan speed but gives the correct reading for the hard drive temperature in the one-fan MacMini. SSD Fan Control allows me to select "Manual" to control the runaway optical drive heat sensor. I can set the fan speed anywhere between 1500 and 5500 rpm. I've chosen 2000 rpm, which is inaudible and everything stays below 50C (at ambient 34C). Right now I'm heading over to the developer's site to make a donation. Easy installation, nice design, solved my problem -- thanks for the tip!

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    Quote Originally Posted by veganicity View Post
    Right now I'm heading over to the developer's site to make a donation. Easy installation, nice design, solved my problem -- thanks for the tip!
    I second that. $20 to fix a problem that threatened to ruin a $700 computer? I feel like a bit of a cheapskate but it's all I can afford.

    In the process of installing an SSD in a mini server I succeeded in breaking the sensor. This software solution absolutely saved my ass.

    Thank heavens for the Internet, Google and most of all MacGurus for pointing me to the solution.

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    I broke one myself.

    Very frustrating that it is so small and fragile. Makes me gun shy about doing HD swaps in Minis now. Which is just not right!

    This was several years ago....I hope the solder is more robust now, but I fear the design/fab on the board is unchanged.



    One other thing that could make these tiny sensors, cables—and problems—go away: standardized firmware level sensors built into HD and SSD units, and info that passes over the standard sata port (new SATA standard?). Wouldn't that be nice?

    Apple already does it on iMacs since late 2009 models, but using their own spec drive firmware. Should be an industry standard, so any drive can be swapped.

    until then, thank God for these developers!
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

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    Unhappy Should Have Known.....

    New to Macs, been building PC's since 8 bit 8086's, and just bought this mid 2010 Mac Mini from a friend. Bumped the memory to max, no problem. Bought a Samsung SSD and proceeded to install the drive. Having repaired many iPhones for friends and family, figured the Mac Mini would be spacious by comparison. Well there's more room but I swear the connections are more delicate. While gently pulling up on the OD Thermal Sensor wires, the entire receptacle broke off the board. My bad.

    Don't want to start poking around the logic board with a 500 degree poker trying to solder something the size of a human hair...a blonde one no less, so was looking for a software solution. Looks like the exirion.net solution may work and I'll find out this evening.

    If it does, I'll make a donation in the name of the group! What a great resource you are, thank you!

    Maybe someday I'll have something worth while to contribute...

    Cheers!

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    Welcome aboard, sorry to meet like this.

    Please report back, successful or not, so we can continue to collect info!
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

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    Default It Works....!

    Quote Originally Posted by unclemac View Post
    Welcome aboard, sorry to meet like this.

    Please report back, successful or not, so we can continue to collect info!
    Update - It worked ! the Exirion fan control referenced in a previous post did the trick. Install was simple and allowed manual control of the fan speed. As the code was written for a multi-fan unit, the reporting is a little off as the Mini has only one fan but it reported the SSD temp and the fan RPM and allowed manual control of the fan speed.

    FYI - Set my fan speed to 2500 rpm, I can't hear the fan running at that speed where the Mini is located. After playing a Netflix movie, doing an initial time machine backup, unpacking a movie file (.rar files), playing iTunes audio through the fibre-optic output, importing, editing and emailing a few full size images, downloading about 2 gig worth of product files and opening as many apps as I could think of, the reported SSD temp went from 72 degrees F to a max of 86 degrees F. It seemed to stay at 72-74 F most of the time and only hit the 80's when I started loading it up. Not sure what the normal temp range should be but I'm thinking in the 80's is pretty safe.

    Also, the Mini was turned off, power disconnected and the unit relocated. During the next boot, the fan came on at full speed but a few seconds later, it slowed back down to reduced speed level without any input from me. Very Nice!

    Not sure what the operating temp should be but I don't see the Mini doing that much stuff, all at once, very often. I had combed the internet for a fair amount of time yesterday looking for a solution. Read all types of suggestions and stories but no one offered the solution that was found here so Thank You very much for your assistance.

    Now it's off to figure out how to setup TRIM......

    Cheers!

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    Great. Thanks for the report. I would guess that missing sensor sends the fan into high mode (by design) until software can load and tell it slow down.

    Trim Enabler worked nicely for me on my last rig with an OCZ SSD.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

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    Trim Enabler worked nicely for me on my last rig with an OCZ SSD.
    Thanks, I'll check it out.
    Last edited by ricks; 12-06-2012 at 10:59 AM. Reason: added quote

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    Default Mac Mini - Fan Issue - SSD Fan Control won't launch.

    Quote Originally Posted by veganicity View Post
    Unclemac, Damien, Thanks so much for your input and great advice! I installed SSD Fan Control from exirion.net and can report that it does work in my mid-2010 Unibody MacMini. Since it's designed for the two-fan iMac, it gives an erroneous reading for the hard drive fan speed but gives the correct reading for the hard drive temperature in the one-fan MacMini. SSD Fan Control allows me to select "Manual" to control the runaway optical drive heat sensor. I can set the fan speed anywhere between 1500 and 5500 rpm. I've chosen 2000 rpm, which is inaudible and everything stays below 50C (at ambient 34C). Right now I'm heading over to the developer's site to make a donation. Easy installation, nice design, solved my problem -- thanks for the tip!

    Hello,
    I had the same issue (fan running at a very high speed all the time but the mac mini did not feel hot at all) and was relieved to find this thread/site.

    However, the SSD Fan Control application refuses to even launch. I get 'The application SSD Fan Control quit unexpectedly' message. I have pasted the System Config & Problem Details. ANY HELP HERE WOULD BE APPRECIATED. This issue started several months ago, then stopped completely for a cpl months, and now it's back again.

    PROBLEM DETAILS:
    ---------------------
    Process: SSD Fan Control [201]
    Path: /Applications/SSD Fan Control.app/Contents/MacOS/SSD Fan Control
    Identifier: net.exirion.SSD-Fan-Control
    Version: ??? (???)
    Code Type: X86-64 (Native)
    Parent Process: launchd [152]

    OS Version: Mac OS X 10.5.8 (9L31a)
    Report Version: 6

    Exception Type: EXC_BREAKPOINT (SIGTRAP)
    Exception Codes: 0x0000000000000002, 0x0000000000000000
    Crashed Thread: 0

    Dyld Error Message:
    ----------------------
    Symbol not found: __NSConcreteGlobalBlock
    Referenced from: /Applications/SSD Fan Control.app/Contents/MacOS/SSD Fan Control
    Expected in: /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib

    SYSTEM CONFIG:
    -------------------
    Model: Macmini3,1, BootROM MM31.0081.B06, 2 processors, Intel Core 2 Duo, 2 GHz, 1 GB
    Graphics: kHW_NVidiaGeForce9400Item, NVIDIA GeForce 9400, sppci_pci_device, 128 MB


    --------- Thanks.

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    Default Mac Mini - Fan issue - SSD Fan Control not launching.

    Hello,
    I have had the same issue i.e. fan running at a very high rpm all the time, for several months. The problem just went away for a cpl months and now is back again. Finally found this thread/site & was relieved that the 'ssd fan control' application worked for several people. BUT IT FAILS TO LAUNCH on my Mac Mine I have pasted the problem details/sys config below. Any help would be really really appreciated ... find this terribly frustrating.

    Error Msg: Application quit unexpectedly (when i attempt to launch it ...)

    PROBLEM DETAILS:
    ---------------------
    Process: SSD Fan Control [201]
    Path: /Applications/SSD Fan Control.app/Contents/MacOS/SSD Fan Control
    Identifier: net.exirion.SSD-Fan-Control
    Version: ??? (???)
    Code Type: X86-64 (Native)
    Parent Process: launchd [152]

    OS Version: Mac OS X 10.5.8 (9L31a)
    Report Version: 6

    Exception Type: EXC_BREAKPOINT (SIGTRAP)
    Exception Codes: 0x0000000000000002, 0x0000000000000000
    Crashed Thread: 0

    Dyld Error Message:
    Symbol not found: __NSConcreteGlobalBlock
    Referenced from: /Applications/SSD Fan Control.app/Contents/MacOS/SSD Fan Control
    Expected in: /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib


    SYSTEM CONFIG:
    -------------------
    Model: Macmini3,1, BootROM MM31.0081.B06, 2 processors, Intel Core 2 Duo, 2 GHz, 1 GB
    Graphics: kHW_NVidiaGeForce9400Item, NVIDIA GeForce 9400, sppci_pci_device, 128 MB


    Regards.

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    Your SSD fan control is a 64 bit native app and you might be trying to run it on a 32 bit system. Not sure if the core2 can do 64…
    Damien,

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    Wonder if it is compatible with 10.5. Dunno, no spec on the website. Might try emailing the dev. Assuming he is still working on this, he should welcome any feedback about issues.

    As for your fan issue.....did this Mini ever have a hard drive swap, or other disassembly? The other thing to consider is that you have the prev gen Mini. It does not have the same specific issue with the easy-to-break sensor on the logic board. It does have a cable to a sensor that must be correctly connected, or you get high fans. I have seen a couple of this gen have this issue.......long before this fix was around, so don't know if it will work on this machine. Worth trying if you can get the app to work.

    Pretty sure this is your model take-arart guide. Notice this plug if you go looking:



    The other end goes to the logic board IIRC.

    The take-apart on this mini is less challenging....less fragile. But need to get that cable correctly connected.

    You know there is a chance that there is an OS issue too? If the OS can't talk with the sensors, then fans ramp up to full speed. Before you do any surgery, you might consider a new OS install. If you have an external USB or FW drive, you could install on it and boot to and test from that too, to see if the problem goes away with a virgin OS. If not, then likely a hardware/sensor issue after all.


    Wow, only 1GB of RAM? 2GB or more would make 10.5.8 a lot nicer.....
    Last edited by unclemac; 02-14-2013 at 09:56 AM.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

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    Lightbulb Another option:

    Dug around (a lot!) for fan control for 2012 iMac while in Bootcamp mode. Fans sit on idle no matter how hot the machine gets.....while running a game for example. Not good.

    So, turns out SMC controls in bootcamp mode (running Win 7) seem to do nothing. Long story short, others are looking for this, as it is a real problem. Several open source solutions, but none that looked good to me. Then I found this:

    http://www.crystalidea.com/macs-fan-control

    Looks like there is a Mac and a Win version of the same tool. Free right now, though in beta. Don't know what the cost will be..... The Windows tool is GREAT!!

    Perfect. Full control, set fans manually, to your own safe temps, monitor temps. Literally perfect to control all 3 fans in this iMac. Fans ramp up, iMac stays cool while in Win 7, just like the Mac side.

    The Mac version looks good too, and I hope will help with this Mini (and other models) issue. Notice they specifically mention HD swaps on late model iMacs (high fan without specific firmware info from specific Apple HDs), so it looks promising. Have not tried the Mac version yet, as I don't have a fan issue to fix right now. Knock wood.

    Will test it anyway....at some point. Anybody out there that has any feedback, let's here it!
    Last edited by unclemac; 03-29-2013 at 09:20 PM.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

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