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Thread: Mac Pro 8-core

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    26

    Default Mac Pro 8-core

    I have not heard any reviews of the new Mac Pro 8-cores yet. There seems to
    be very little information out there. Have you had a chance to test them? I am
    looking at the 3.0 GHz model with an additional 8 GB Ram, the Nividia Ge Force 8800 card, and using Raptors for Start up (150Gb), and Scratch disc (74GB), although I have been considering the new 7200.11 Seagates as well, but I really don't need a 500 GB Start up disc and a 500 GB Scratch disc. My primary use is for Photoshop and Music. Any thoughts and opinions would be very appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Under the Midnight Sun
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    656

    Default I have been eyeing as well..

    couple 2cents...

    It appears (from lots and lots of reading) the 3.0 may use the 120watt processors.. personally I would save some $ and buy the 2.8 octo, and perhaps the raid card. (the 2.8's are 80watts). This is from random reading and may be completely false...

    Bail on the Raptor 150... the speed is just not there over a 7200.11 or even a SAS drive (good stuff!). My money would be spent on a Samsung 1TB, a Seagate 1TB or the new WD 1TB.

    Do you really need 8GB of memory?

    8800 a fine choice!
    MacBook Pro Uni 2.4GHz with express card slot

    iMac G5

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Grangeville, ID USA
    Posts
    9,142

    Default

    Personally, I would never buy the MegaRAID card. It is an expensive and slow card - and takes over the precious internal slots that work perfectly as SATA. Better by far to get an external port RAID card and have some speed and capability beyond the internal port MegaRAID card.

    The new PCIe slots are a great improvement over the last ones. Lots of bandwidth for future upgrades!

    As we see better software to take advantage of all those cores we are going to see the 8 Core MacPro really come into its own. Nice machine!

    Rick
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    26

    Default Mac Pro

    Thanks for the heads up on the Raptors. I could use some advice on what size hard drive I should use for for Start Up as well as for Scratch Disc.
    The primary use for will be for Photoshop CS3. I was under the impression that it would be better to have a smaller, faster start up disc for operations, such as the Raptor, and use Burlys for storage & backup. What would be the advantage to using the Seagate 7200.11 1000GB drive or the 750GB or the
    500GB as my start up drive. I realize that they are as fast, if not faster than
    the Raptors, but do I need all of that extra capacity. I could partition the disk so that the OS will be in the front for faster access, and use the
    remaining space for storage, and of course, still have a backup in place. Is that the way to go? In terms of Scratch Disc, I would like to stay with the same units, so I think that the 500GB 7200.11 would be more than
    sufficient for my needs. Does this make sense or am I missing something?

    From what I've read on memory, the more the better for the Mac Pro 8-core. According to Barefeats, they recommend at least 8GB, and filling all 8 slots for maximum speed. Any further thoughts would be most appreciated.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    NW Montana
    Posts
    8,197

    Default

    What would be the advantage to using the Seagate 7200.11 1000GB drive or the 750GB or the 500GB as my start up drive. I realize that they are as fast, if not faster than the Raptors, but do I need all of that extra capacity. I could partition the disk so that the OS will be in the front for faster access, and use the remaining space for storage, and of course, still have a backup in place. Is that the way to go?
    This is done often. Partition and use the remaining space in your backup stragities.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Grangeville, ID USA
    Posts
    9,142

    Default

    I like using big drives for the OS. I like to use an identical drive for drive 2 and move my Users directory and an applications folder to that drive. Then I back up one to the other like this:




    Boots built the image for a guide I have about done. This is the setup we use on every computer at MacGurus. Makes for a fast setup and one that is easy to backup.

    Rick
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

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