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Thread: Minimum Temp during Storage

  1. #1
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    Default Minimum Temp during Storage

    I guess this is kind of a stupid question, but here goes......

    I am moving from the midwest to Arizona, this week. My trusty G4 tower has been packed up, with accessories, and will be riding in the car with me this week.

    Looks like I will be encountering some temperatures, at the very lowest, around the mid-30s (not Celsius, for all you Europeans and Canadians!).

    This brought about a question.... approximately WHAT is the lowest temperature that one can store a Mac without fear of doing any damage? If the temperature dropped below 32 degrees, would that potentially be a problem for any of the components or hard drives?

    Other than for security, is there any reason why the computer can't just stay in the car at night en route to the new house?

    Thanks Gurus..... just need a little reassurance and some of that redoubtable Gurus logic

  2. #2
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    Default

    Not to worry about the hard drive. Nonoperating minimum temps are way below what you should encounter. Looking at a Seagate drive, minimum nonoperating is -40C. Operating its minimum is 0C.

    The one thing I discovered when a new Mac was shipped to me in the winter is that there was a very light film of condensation on the metal parts inside. Ran my finger across a metal part and could see it very easily. I just let it warm up inside the house until that film dried up. k

  3. #3
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    Default

    Yes I would be more concerned with moisture/condensation than temps. Bringing something cold into a warm environment will cause any moisture present to condense just like when you take that cold beer out of the fridge, and set it on the table.

    When you get to AZ just open the tower up once you get it inside. It should dry out in no time in the desert.

  4. #4
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    Lightbulb Apple Specs

    Similar storage temps for most hardware, regardless of brand. Let's check the manuals, shall we?

    Mac Pro:
    Electrical and environmental requirements
    • Line voltage: 100-120V AC or 200-240V AC (wide-range power supply input voltage)
    • Frequency: 50Hz to 60Hz single phase
    • Current: Maximum of 12A (low-voltage range) or 6A (high-voltage range)
    • Operating temperature: 50 to 95 F (10 to 35 C)
    • Storage temperature: -40 to 116 F (-40 to 47 C)
    • Relative humidity: 5% to 95% noncondensing
    • Maximum altitude: 10,000 feet
    MacBook:
    Electrical and environmental requirements
    • Line voltage: 100-240V AC
    • Frequency: 50Hz to 60Hz
    • Operating temperature: 50 to 95 F (10 to 35 C)
    • Storage temperature: -13 to 113 F (-24 to 45 C)
    • Relative humidity: 0% to 90% noncondensing
    • Maximum operating altitude: 10,000 feet
    • Maximum storage altitude: 15,000 feet
    • Maximum shipping altitude: 35,000 feet
    The mini has the same temp specs as the MacPro.

    New Alum iMac:
    Electrical and environmental requirements
    • Line voltage: 100-240V AC
    • Frequency: 50Hz to 60Hz, single phase
    • Maximum continuous power: 200W (20-inch models); 280W (24-inch model)
    • Operating temperature: 50 to 95 F (10 to 35 C)
    • Storage temperature: -40 to 185 F (-40 to 85 C)
    • Relative humidity: 5% to 95% noncondensing
    • Maximum altitude: 10,000 feet
    You can see there are some variables, but farily extreme specs, so you should be OK, outside of the condensation already noted.

    Interesting that the MacBook specs make it appear to be (relatively) fragile. At a top storage temp of 113 F, don't leave your MacBook in your trunk or car for even a few minutes in the summer....and don't take one to Iraq or Arizona in a backpack either. I think that 113 F is a typo or a very conservative spec.

    Similar for the MacPro. I can tell you that many servers are certified to run in a room up to 115 F. That's operating temp, not storage temp. I can tell you that they can handle it, at least for short peiods. Had a AC failure during a heat wave (when else?) and a server room was pushing 100 F, with no issues. Dells, an IBM, and a couple Macs, only rated at 95 F. I think Apple is conservative in general with these type of specs.

    FWIW, at work we had a supplier that overnighted lots of gear, which was great, but coming out of the air cargo bay, stuff was cold, and often would have condensation. We always let it sit a good long while to be fully dry inside and out.

    Did someone say cold beer? Yes please.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

  5. #5
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    Default Very helpful info indeed...

    Thanks a bunch, you swell Gurus....

    I was pretty sure that there was some wiggle room on the temps, but just wanted to make sure. IT IS, afterall, my baby (perhaps not as modded as some others here), but I have spent a lot of time upgrading it, just wanted to make sure it would be OK.

    And if that weren't enough, I STILL HAVE the original box it came in.

    Awesome!

    (Can you say 'some people never throw ANYTHING away'?)

    Innaresting info that uncle mac posted. I had no idea the laptops were so sensitive.

    Soooooo, I'll be sure to give the machine a good airing upon arrival. Thanks everyone!!!

  6. #6
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    Default

    My wife, Da Boss, makes huge fun of me, always at my expense, over saving original boxes. I have originals for anything that might ever conceivably need to get shipped, no matter who minute the possibility. (how she puts it) I got most all of them. Have a nice place to store them though. For some folks that just isn't very practical... someone with a flat in the big city where it's 100 grand for the broom closet, comes to mind.

    I agree with you. Having the original boxes sure pays when moving.

    Hey, tell us about where you are headed to. When you get a chance - I want to hear about it.

    Rick
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  7. #7
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    Mar 2002
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    Default check this!

    i just put a couple of silicon (dry packs) inside the case before the trip.

    a frirend of mine works for IBM as a tech and gave me two large bags that they use for shipping large items in.

    have you ever heard of "soil moist" for plants?
    basicly the same stuff.... i think...or not.

    h

  8. #8
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    Default

    Silica desiccant is used to absorb moisture i.e keep things dry. Probably not the best thing to keep soil moist.

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