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Thread: IDE Drive repair

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    50

    Default IDE Drive repair

    The new g5 arrived, love it, thanks gurus for the tips.
    one of the two IDE drives from my g4 seem shot, of course the one that had lots of data that I would prefer to recover,sentimental stuff, not clients wanting to murder me or anything. I am going to make an attempt to recover it myself. I plug in the power cord and it doesnt spin, it never made any noise so I'm hoping it's not the mechanisms, hoping its something on the PCB. I am having a hard time finding an identical drive to swap the boards off of, wondering how I figure out what other drives might use he same PCB. Also in case I DO find the same model, some times there are subtle differences.
    For instance I see on this drive it says:
    Model: Maxtor
    HDA: 06A
    PCBA: 07A
    Unique: A3A
    Code: DA620XS0

    What does this all mean and what are the critical things I need to match up?
    Obviously I'd like to have the EXACT same drive to swap parts off of, but what things will apply to me and what I need to do.
    Save me Gurus!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    NW Montana
    Posts
    8,197

    Default

    If I understand all the busses in a G5 are SATA ... Not IDE/ATA. So an IDE drive won't connect properly to an SATA connections.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Grangeville, ID USA
    Posts
    9,122

    Default

    A couple tricks of the trade.


    First, before doing anything make sure you have the ability to physically connect the problem hard drive to a bus that supports it. That bus MUSt connect to a computer that has drive space available to copy the data off onto. DOes no good to get a drive up and running for an hour only to not be ready with a place to copy it to.

    A drive that is not spinning may benefit from freezing the drive. We often try that as it frees up the mechanical fit and often allows them to run for a while. Put the drive in a anti static bag and then inside a sealed bag to keep moisture out. Cool it down in the freezer for an hour or so and see if it spins.

    If it doesn't, often you can give it a sharp rotating blow with the heel of your hand and get it started spinning. To do that you need to have the drive out on the table unmounted from any enclosure. Hard part is having the right cabling around to accomplish that.

    Most time not spinning has nothing to do with the PCB but is a mechanical issue. The solid state portion of a hard drive is always least likely culprit in any failure.
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,044

    Default

    Cool info Rick,
    No pun intended...
    often you can give it a sharp rotating blow with the heel of your hand and get it started spinning.
    Never heard that one but makes sense.
    I have used a similar approach in the past but thought it was My idea haha.
    Thanks,
    Dave
    The more you know, the more you know you don't know.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    50

    Default OK let me Clarify

    I should have given more background. I already bought an IDE to usb bridge from Unclemacs suggestion, it worked lovely on the working drive I took out of my g4. Now when I say it's not SPINNING, I dont mean like it powerd up and it's stuck or something. I plug in the power cord and NOTHING happens, no noises, no lights (not that there are any) but I have to assume that something blew on the pcb board board first and that the drive is not spinning because of an electrical issue.

    If thats not the case then I will assume it's mechanically stuck, or the motor is blown. But theres enough electronics on that board for me to think the problem is more likely there. The drive never made any strange sounds or anything before it died. Can anyone give me feedback on the original question. Specifically, if I buy another maxtor drive to switch the pcb from, or god forbid, to try and swap the platter into (absolutely last resort I'm sure) there are a lot of numbers on that drive besides the model number and I'm no sure what to make of them.

    I can not assume that an 07A from one maxtor is the same as another 07A from a different model drive. Of course I'd like to match all the traits exactly, but I'm just not finding a perfect match.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,044

    Default

    My 2 cents.
    Perhaps not your situation but...
    I have had very few actual drives fail.
    Usually was a jumper, cable or interface compatibly issue.
    Maxtor drives are somewhat famous for being fussy.
    Just a consideration ,
    Good Luck.

    Dave
    The more you know, the more you know you don't know.

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