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Thread: Vista

  1. #21
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    Lightbulb Mozilla 64-bit versions

    Download

    Firefox for Windows x64 download


    Thunderbird for Windows x64 download

    DON'T INSTALL TALKBACK (QUALITY FEEDBACK AGENT). IF YOU SELECT IT, SETUP DOESN'T FINISH.

  2. #22
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    Lightbulb Rootkit

    The Dissection of a Rootkit

    DATE: 23-FEB-2007
    By Lisa Vaas

    Security analysts have been predicting that kernel rootkits, which cloak their activity by replacing a portion of a program's software kernel with modified code, are expected to continue to grow in frequency in 2007.

    While rootkit-fighting technologies such as the PatchGuard kernel protection system built into 64-bit versions of Microsoft's new Windows Vista operating system are arriving, most PC users will still be left open to the attacks over the next twelve months, CA has said, and even experienced PC users are vulnerable to their sophisticated techniques.
    F-Secure Security Labs has been tracking and dissecting kernel malware for years; this form of attack was first spotted as far back as 1999, in the form of the WinNT/Infis attack.
    Last edited by TZ; 04-03-2007 at 12:52 PM.

  3. #23
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    Lightbulb Sharing Services

    Mac OS X/Windows Vista file sharing, printer sharing issues: fixes It appears that there are some issues with file sharing between Mac OS X and Windows Vista systems. Several users are reporting problems with seeing shared files in both directions via Samba (SMB) networking. Users are also reporting issues with previously used (under Windows XP) printer sharing methods.

  4. #24
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    Lightbulb Tom's Hardware weighs in...

    Patrick Schmid, Achim Roos
    January 29, 2007 09:16

    Is Windows Vista Faster Than XP?


    "We are sure that mainstream users will appreciate the improved usability of Windows Vista, and the average office/multimedia user will likely never notice the lack of OpenGL. However, a chapter on the overall performance of Windows Vista requires more dedication."

  5. #25
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    Lightbulb Vista Activation bug

    Vista bug forces legit users to reactivate OS

    Microsoft releases fix, says problem 'rarely occurs'

    February 26, 2007 (Computerworld) -- A bug in Windows Vista's built-in antipiracy technology is telling some users that they need to reactivate the operating system after they install new device drivers or run newly installed software.

    Microsoft Corp. quietly issued a patch designed to fix the flaw in its Software Protection Platform (SPP) technology late last month. Criticized by some when it was announced last fall, SPP is an updated and more aggressive version of the Windows Genuine Advantage antipiracy tools that Microsoft included with Windows XP. But because of the bug, SPP may suddenly demand that a copy of Vista be "activated" even though the user and/or the computer maker did so earlier.

    "You may be prompted to activate Windows Vista on a computer on which Windows Vista activation was not previously required," Microsoft said in a support document last updated Feb. 15. "Although this problem rarely occurs, it may occur during typical use of a Windows Vista-based computer. For example, this problem may occur under one or more of the following conditions: You install a device driver, you install a program, you run a new program, you remove a program."

    One Vista user commenting on Microsoft's Windows Vista Validation Issues support forum reported that he ran into the bug after he had updated his PC's BIOS.

    Vista must be activated within 30 days of its first use, or else it drops into what Microsoft calls a "reduced functionality" mode -- a crippled condition in which only the operating system's Web browser works, and then for only an hour at a time.

    Unless a PC's hardware is substantially changed, activating Vista should be a one-time chore. Many hardware vendors preactivate the operating system for users before their machines leave the factory. But if users are asked to reactivate Vista, they only have a grace period of three days, not 30, to get everything on their systems shipshape.

    Microsoft said the reactivation flaw crops up when a program running with administrative credentials removes a system setting. That in turn can trigger the failure of a BIOS validation check, which is part of the activation process. For example, running Intuit Inc.'s QuickBooks 2007 software can bring up the reactivation demand, Microsoft added. But, it said, "this problem may also infrequently occur when you install other programs or device drivers."

    And the issue is a bug in the operating system, Microsoft acknowledged. "This problem does not occur because of an issue in the installed program or device driver," the company said in the support document. "This problem is caused by a system problem in Windows Vista.

    According to Microsoft, the fix for the bug has been labeled as a "recommended" update. A Microsoft spokeswoman confirmed that the patch was placed in the company's Windows Update pipeline at the end of January. "If customers didn't receive it via Windows Update, the update can be downloaded," she said.

    Microsoft has posted 32-bit and 64-bit versions of the patch on its Web site. Ironically, the patches can only be retrieved by PCs that pass another check to determine if their operating systems are legitimate.

    Messages on the Vista Validation Issues forum indicate that in some situations, the only solution to the problem is to activate the operating system via the telephone. Users opting for that approach should enter "slui 4" in a command box to display the opening prompts for Microsoft's automated phone activation system.

    Microsoft didn't immediately respond to e-mails seeking information on the number of users who have been affected by the bug.

  6. #26
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    Lightbulb Windows Vista Top 10 Tips and Tricks

    Windows Vista Top 10 Tips and Tricks
    Posted: 2007-02-27
    Author: Zoran Petrovic
    Manufacturer: Microsoft

    1. Power Button Default Action
    2. Hide Desktop Icon Text on Windows Vista
    3. Enable Hidden BootScreen in Windows Vista
    4. Fix for COM Surrogate Has Stopped Working Error in Vista
    5. Stop an Application from Running at Startup in Windows Vista
    6. Emptying Windows Vista Temp Files Directory
    7. Disable User Account Control (UAC) For Administrators Only
    8. Using Windows Vista System Restore
    9. Verify the Integrity of Windows Vista System Files
    10. Disable Hibernation & Delete the Hibernation File

    http://blog.symbiancentral.com/


  7. #27
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    Lightbulb Vista Prone to Legacy Threats

    Symantec: Out of the Box, Vista Prone to Legacy Threats
    The company takes another swipe at the operating system in a series of papers that explore new security features in Vista as well as Microsoft's overhauls of older technologies.


    Only the 64-bit version of Vista is equipped with this technology, while the 32-bit—likely to be the standard deployment for some years to come—is not.

    PatchGuard, as its name implies, protects the kernel from being patched or extended in kernel memory—tampering that can give malicious code a way to load into the heart of the operating system. However, the paper points out, rootkit writers use the same techniques as PatchGuard to ensure their actions aren't detected.

    "The kernel integrity protection mechanisms that are present on 64-bit Windows Vista can only be described as a bump in the road," it said. "While these technologies may slow down an attacker, they do not provide a meaningful defense against a determined attacker."

    Symantec researchers in fact managed to disable all three of Vista's primary kernel protections: driver signing, code integrity and PatchGuard. "Results have shown that all three technologies can be permanently disabled and removed from Windows Vista after approximately one man-week of effort," the paper said. "A potential victim need make only one mistake to become infected by such a threat. The result: All new security technologies are stripped from their Windows Vista installation in their entirety."

    As for Microsoft's UAC (User Account Control), a prompt that requires user approval when an application attempts to escalate privileges, Whitehouse had earlier this month posted a way to trick Vista into allowing a malicious prompt to come off as legitimate by posing as a Windows system component. Microsoft isn't recognizing this as a vulnerability, given that UAC isn't considered a hard security boundary, as is a firewall, for example. Rather, Microsoft says, UAC is a chance to verify an attack before it happens.

    Symantec: Vista (still) prone to attack
    I was impressed enough by Symantec's researchers to purchase "Internet Security 2007"
    Last edited by TZ; 02-28-2007 at 04:02 PM.

  8. #28
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    Lightbulb Memory management

    Jeff Atwood explains why Vista uses so much memory. "You have to stop thinking of system memory as a resource and start thinking of it as a a cache. Just like the level 1 and level 2 cache on your CPU, system memory is yet another type of high-speed cache that sits between your computer and the disk drive. And the most important rule of cache design is that empty cache memory is wasted cache memory. Empty cache isn't doing you any good. It's expensive, high-speed memory sucking down power for zero benefit. The primary mission in the life of every cache is to populate itself as quickly as possible with the data that's most likely to be needed - and to consistently deliver a high 'hit rate' of needed data retrieved from the cache."

  9. #29
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    Lightbulb Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR)

    Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR) is a mitigation technique designed to hinder the ability of an attacker to achieve arbitrary code execution when exploiting software vulnerabilities. As the name implies, ASLR involves placing a computer program and its associated memory at random locations, either between reboots or executions, to hinder the attacker's ability to reliably locate either their shell code or other required data. This paper is the result of a brief analysis of the implementation of ASLR within Microsoft Windows Vista 32bit RTM, conducted by Symantec's Advanced Threat Research.

    Address Space Layout Randomization (ASLR)

    Blackhat Conference

  10. #30
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    Lightbulb Security vendor support for Vista


    New features in OS complicate porting of antivirus tools, other products

    February 28, 2007 (Computerworld) -- Windows Vista's revamped security features are posing difficulties for some IT security vendors looking to make their software work on the new operating system. Security vendors lagging on support for Vista

    Symantec: Vista Blocks Almost All Malware, For Now
    On Wednesday, Symantec Security Response released several whitepapers on security in Windows Vista, concluding that the operating system isn't secure, just more secure. The paper also noted that the 64-bit version of Vista adds an additional security feature.

  11. #31
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    Lightbulb Windows Vista Roundtable

    The InformationWeek Windows Vista Roundtable: Part One

    What do IT managers, consultants, programmers, and everyday users really think about Vista? We invited six of our readers to give their opinions -- and we got an earful.


    By Barbara Krasnoff, InformationWeek
    March 1, 2007
    URL: http://www.informationweek.com/story/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=197008349



    We've all heard from dozens -- actually hundreds -- of analysts, journalists, pundits, bloggers, and other opinionated writers about Vista. They've written about its interface, its features, its development, its PR machine... But one segment we haven't heard from are the actual users -- the IT managers, consultants, programmers, and everyday users who are the ones who will have to actually deal with installing, learning, tweaking, and fixing Vista in their workplaces and homes.

    To find out how Vista is being approached in the trenches, we invited six InformationWeek.com readers to a week-long roundtable discussion. Participants included:

    • Dennis Barr, Manager, Information Technology for the Larkin Group
    • Marc Chester, Vice President, Business Development for Data Reduction Systems
    • Bill Flanagan, independent IT/networking consultant
    • David Gray, Vice President for Information Technology & CIO and CEO, UMassOnline for the University of Massachusetts
    • Chris Rutkowski, IT Manager for Reliant Behavioral Health
    • Wayne Wengert, retired programmer/IT specialist
    Over the next week, we'll find out what these IT professionals think about the introduction of Vista, its pros and cons, and the likelihood that it will be adopted in their workplaces. In this, the first of five segments, the participants introduce themselves and offer their initial opinions about Microsoft's new OS.


  12. #32
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    Lightbulb Kernel Malware

    The Dissection of a Rootkit


    F-Secure Security Labs has been tracking and dissecting kernel malware for years; this form of attack was first spotted as far back as 1999, in the form of the WinNT/Infis attack. F-Secure researcher Kimmo Kasslin has made the findings available in a paper titled "Kernel Malware: The Attack from Within" (a PDF) as well as in a slide show (also a PDF). Kasslin explains in detail what kernel malware is, how it works, and what makes its detection and removal so challenging. He also details two malware cases that use kernel-mode techniques to escape detection and to bypass personal firewalls.

    Black Hat Demonstrations Shatter Hardware Hacking Myths


    DATE: 01-MAR-2007
    By Lisa Vaas

    ARLINGTON, Va.ÑUnless you were at Black Hat on Feb. 28, you probably woke up safe in the assumption that if a rootkit hit your system, reimaging would remove it. You probably also thought that the best way to search a PC's volatile memory, or RAM, was by grabbing it with a PCI card or a FireWire bus.

  13. #33
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    Lightbulb Installation Support

    Windows Vistaª Support
    http://vistasupport.mvps.org/install_windows_vista.htm

    Walks you thorugh setup process in 37 steps.

    FAQ:
    http://vistasupport.mvps.org/vista_faq.htm

    Windows Vista power users guide

    Click to open... http://www.inspirare.net/pdf/VistaPower.pdf
    Page summary or clip -
    Found this over at Windows Connected. Mike Halsey has created a really in depth look at Windows Vista that everyone should at least have a look at. It includes an appendix on how to get started with Microsoft Office 2007.

    Last edited by TZ; 03-01-2007 at 02:13 PM.

  14. #34
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    Lightbulb eSATA 64-bit driver support

    Lycom and CalDigit cards are compatible with Vista 32 & 64 with specific drivers for each. If you'll only need two ports you can use the PCI Express 1X lane cards. both of these manufacturers have PCI-X cards

    "Microsoft Certified".

    I haven't had any problems installing hardware on Vista as long as the drivers are available. It's different enough that XP drivers will not work in most if not all cases.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brain
    I'll start off by saying that I'm running Vista 32 on a test machine here but have no experience with Vista 64. In almost all cases you'll have better performance and data security keeping your storage natively SATA rather than using a Firewire interface.

    Both the Lycom and CalDigit cards are compatible with Vista 32 & 64 with specific drivers for each. If you'll only need two ports you can use the PCI Express 1X lane cards. These cards will both support up to 10 drives including the Seagate .10 drives you have. In fact about the only drives they don't like when used with a PM enclosure are the Enterprise class drives due to firmware incompatibilities. If you prefer both of these manufacturers have PCI-X cards available with Vista drivers. The ports on any of these cards can be direct connected.

    Lycom 2 port PCIe = PE-102M (Mac/PC version without RAID 5 function)
    Lycom 4 port PCI-X = 64-105e

    You shouldn't have hot swap problems with Vista but you may need an outside application to dismount the drives. Again, I haven't tried it on a Vista 64 machine.

    Stay away from the Sonnet cards if infected with Vista, the drivers for their chipsets do not yet exsist.

    I doubt you'll find many drivers "Microsoft Certified". I haven't had any problems installing hardware on Vista as long as the drivers are available. It's different enough that XP drivers will not work in most if not all cases. If the driver is not recognized as Certified you will see a pop-up window asking you to verify your trust in the driver. Other Vista users may experience other issues, I can only comment on what I have tried up to this point. I haven't had much time to test hardware on the Vista platform but I'm fitting it in as time permits.

    Lycom has been around for quite a while and has a large product base. They are a lower cost alternative to the CalDigit and Sonnet PM capable cards. Like Rick said, a lot of other companies are re-stickering the Lycom products in their own name and in some cases charging over three times the cost. We have very few problems with their product line. If you want top of the line go with the CalDigit especially with the PCIe two port card, it's price is pretty close to the Lycom. Otherwise either brand should work.

    Brian
    pcsupport@macgurus.com

  15. #35
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    Lightbulb Tweaking Companion

    The TweakGuides Tweaking Companion (TGTC) is the complete system optimization guide for Windows users. PDF Vista

  16. #36
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    Lightbulb 3dfx Voodoo drivers for XP

    New drivers for 3dfx range still appear
    Wednesday 07 March 2007, 16:41

    3DFX DIED IN the fourth quarter of 2000 and Windows XP came to life a year after. 3dfx was demolished since Graphzilla did a typical American corporate takeover and unlike AMD+ATI, killed all of the support for the products, claiming it was not responsible for them. The support of 3dfx cards then became a matter for the enthusiast community, which did not have any support from the new owners of 3dfx.

    But seven years after, drivers for 3dfx cards still appear. First of all, it is nearly incredible that enthusiast community managed to support an operating system which was still in the works. Secondly - it is incredible that drivers that support both 32- and 64-bit Windows have just came out.

    If you have a 3dfx card lying around and would like to remember the old days, plug it into the computer and install the drivers that are being designed and produced by 3dfx Italia community, known as the SFFT driver.

    That driver isn't a simple re-do of drivers that came out over half a decade ago, but is, in fact, built on a new, unified marchitecture and is in its Alpha 4.5 release. Unlike previous driver packages which split Voodoo3 and Vodoo4/5 product families, this unified baby supports all Voodoo3 family (Voodoo3 2000, Voodoo3 3000 and Voodoo3 3500 cards), and all 3dfx VSA-100 products (Voodoo4 4500, Voodoo5 5500 and Voodoo5 6000).
    Last edited by TZ; 04-03-2007 at 01:49 PM.

  17. #37
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    Lightbulb FAA considers ditching Vista

    OS and Servers News

    08 March 2007

    Vista gets cool reception from US FAA

    By John E. Dunn, Techworld

    The US Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) is considering ditching Microsoft Vista and Office in favour of Linux running Google’s Apps Premier Edition, an official has said.

    Speaking to Information Week, FAA CIO David Bowen cited technical reasons for the possible shift. "It takes the desktop out of the way so you're running a very thin client. From a security and management standpoint that would have some advantages," he was quoted as saying.

  18. #38
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    Lightbulb Spyware Doctor

    Spyware Doctor Receives Major Upgrade

    DATE: 13-MAR-2007
    By Neil J. Rubenking

    PC Tools on Tuesday released version 5.0 of their flagship product Spyware Doctor, now with integrated antivirus protection, at a price of $39.95. This fully Vista-compatible edition is a complete from-scratch rewrite and has been developed in parallel with the existing Spyware Doctor product over a period of many months. According to PC Tools, "The product has undergone a total "under the hood" overhaul and tune-up, providing users with a new smaller, faster and supercharged Spyware Doctor." The 5.0 product without antivirus is still available for $29.95.

    Spyware Doctor 4.0 won a PC Magazine Editor's Choice award
    The new antivirus protection, developed in-house by PC Tools and fully integrated with the spyware protection, offers on demand, on schedule, and on access scanning. The antivirus has received checkmark certification from West Coast Labs for both virus detection and removal – ICSA Labs is still testing the product.
    Last edited by TZ; 04-03-2007 at 01:47 PM.

  19. #39
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    Lightbulb iTunes and QuickTime for Windows (VBScript)

    iTunes and QuickTime for Windows cannot be installed without Visual Basic Script (VBScript)

    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=304405

  20. #40
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    Lightbulb IE7 Protected Mode

    In Vista, IE7 uses a technique Microsoft calls Protected Mode - another name for "low rights" - that blocks disk access to all but a temporary-files folder. The idea is that if an exploit - a drive-by download, for instance - attacks IE7 through a browser vulnerability, it can't install code on the PC's drive.


    However, the anti-phishing feature is only present in 32-bit IE 7.


    Microsoft OneCare 1.5 (latest) also lacks full support for 64-bit versions of Vista.

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