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Thread: new iceBook - help me before I mod again!

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
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    on the landline, Mr. Smith
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    7,787

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by M.Brane
    For deep scrathes/nicks you'll have to sand first, then buff. For light scratches/haze use clear-coat polish.

    Fine sanding should be done wet.

    Polishing is always a series of: sanding deep enough to get most scrathes, followed by finer sanding, followed by polishing with progressively finer grits until you end up with a mirror-like finish.

    And tired arms.

    You can't skip a step. If you try to go from sanding to finish polish, you won't be taking off enough material to remove the sanding scrathes. So the coarseness of your first pass determines how many more steps until you are done; the coarser the first pass, the more passes you need to get to polished finish.

    I found some off the shelf acrylic polish I used on my Cube that worked pretty well. Did not remove deeper scratches of course, but made it shiny and look more clear. Thought about sanding or even a more coarse polish, but was not up to the task.

    Think hard before you commit to sanding plastic, as there is no going back once you start.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Martinez, GA
    Posts
    448

    Default thanks

    Thanks for the tips. I will keep these in mind. Any grit size recommendations ?

    Mad Dog

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    1hr N/W of LA LA Land
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    3,320

    Default

    Grit size is dependent on how much material you want to remove, and how many more stages you want to go through.

    Sanding marks are not as critical to remove on something that's going to be painted over. On something that's to be polished you'll need to sand completely at each step.

    For removing everyday scratches from something like a laptop you'd probably want to start with 1200, and work your way up the grit scale from there. If the scratches are deeper you might consider starting with 600, but be prepared for a lot more sanding to get the marks out.

    I love my Pismo. A bit of Pledge, and it looks like new!

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    silicon valley, usa
    Posts
    461

    Arrow mood book

    So when I received the thermal LCD sheets, my immediate fear was that the liquid crystals would leak and ooze from the edge when I cut them. So I put off cutting them until after an inital round of iBook temperature testing.

    The material was gloss black on the pretty side, and matte black on the other. Immediately fingerprints became a problem as I worked with the sheets. My finger oils, even after washing my hands in dish soap (gets the grease out) , were perfectly visible, as shown annoyingly well in the high res pictures. However, dissapointing, the thermal crystal sheeting was reacting to the ATI GPU as well as I hoped!



    The color change was dramatic!

    Uncropped 16-bit photos show off of the color definition in the hot spots, as well as reveal the fingerprints on the glossy finish: linky1 | linky2 | linky3

    The thermal colors here define the straight edge of the GPU chip body as well as the holes of the heat sink mounting hardware. I figured that this solid definition of color would be lost when the thermal sheeting was touching the aluminum RFI shield, but that an aluminum shield would be dissipating much the heat over a wider area. This turned out to be true, but not as I expected.

    The sheets were 12" by 12", the iBook required 10-1/2" by 8-1/4", so cutting the sheet was required for the project to continue. I measured the pattern on a piece of paper that shipped with the thermal sheets to protect the glossy side. Muttering "measure twice, cut once" all the while,I decided to use hellishly sharp sewing scissors instead of an xacto.

    Facing the inevitable, I prepared a cloth to wipe up the mess in case the liquid crystals started to leak.

    Continued...
    haiku:
    I can't remember
    the last time I restarted
    I love OS X

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    silicon valley, usa
    Posts
    461

    Default measure once, cut twice

    It turns out there was nothing to fear. There was no leakage from the cut edge. I was able to cut and punch holes everywhere required to allow the sheet to fit the iBook lower case.



    It turned out that the level of detail required to make the sheet fit was greater than I expected. I had to punch holes in nearly all places the aluminum RFI shield had them, it seemed. Then I used the hole punch to start the internal corners of the square hinge cutouts, and later made the cutouts rectangular with scissors..



    Additionally, I had to enlarge all the holes for posts and feet, as well as make larger cutouts for the iBook hinges than I planned. The screw posts were binding on the thermal sheets, causing the thermal sheet to move out of place as I attempted to close the lower shell on the 'book hardware. Reluctantly, I used the scissors to enlarge the holes. It was all to the best. The human imperfections of the enlargements are all obscured by the iBook shell when it's in place.

    This is when my camera ran out of batteries.

    to be Continued ...
    haiku:
    I can't remember
    the last time I restarted
    I love OS X

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    silicon valley, usa
    Posts
    461

    Arrow finally photos

    The thermal sheet I purchased for the iBook LCD lid has a lower temperature threshold than the one for the bottom case.
    - 95?F to 104 ?F = top case active temperature range
    -104?F to 113 ?F = bottom case active temperature range

    The laptop LCD backlight appears to run very cool. The first week of use, I never saw the Thermal sheeting change colors at all. But today I was pleasantly surprised to see a color change in one corner. The photos are crap, because I had only my Treo on hand. (Good thing, too, because I originally cut the bite out of the apple on the wrong side, and had to do a patch job.)




    While I was at it, I shot a few of the bottom of the case. These are the money shots:




    Overall, I'm pleased with the project. There's enough heat in the ATI GPU to make dramatic colors appear acroos nearly half of the case bottom. The photos here represent a fair example of what appears after an hour of surfing/email, or after 15 minutes of video clip watching. Even after a 4-hour surf session, the colors don't expand over the entire case bottom.

    With the top of the case finally changing color today, I'm feeling pretty good about the second sheet on the MoodBook LCD lid.

    I'm considering painting the edges black to make the edges of the thermal sheets ambiguous. However, now that I removed the sleep LED circular hood, the light-pipe aspects of the plexiglas case allows the sleep LED to make a pleasant halo 'round the whole iBook. (unfortunately, photographs of this are not effectively representing the effect) I would not want to mess up that effect by painting the case borders.

    My spouse thinks I should eBay it, but I feel attached for now. Plus, the LED VU meters are still not installed. We'll see.

    Thanks to Terrapin for the mood ring idea.

    -fin?-
    haiku:
    I can't remember
    the last time I restarted
    I love OS X

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Martinez, GA
    Posts
    448

    Default Nice work

    That has to be an original hack. I dont think even the Japanese have tried this one.

    Mad Dog

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