Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Drive doesn't always mount

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    155

    Default Drive doesn't always mount

    It's on the built-in bus in my G5 dually (rev.1) along with the boot drive. Occasionally, it just doesn't show up on boot up. It sometimes takes more than one re-start to get it mounted, then I may have no problems for weeks. It's a 250g Maxtor (Apple OEM - came installed when the machine was new.)

    When mounted, it tests fine in Disk Utility and Disk Warrior, and seems to work properly (no other suspicious sypmtoms.) Could this be the sign of a drive gradually going bad?

    Tom

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    7,056

    Default

    Could be going bad or could be that the power or data connector are not fully connected or partly broken causing an intermittent. Or could be that the volume is so full that the directory is fragmented and so slow to load that the OS does not like that.

    Apparently there is a new feature in Tiger that supports adaptive hot file clustering called Hot Zone. I'm guessing now but I suppose if your drive is too full (65-75%), the directory cannot get fully into this Hot Zone. k

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    155

    Default

    Thanks, Kaye -

    Could be connectors - haven't done a physical inspection yet. Nothing has been moved or changed for months, but I guess stuff occasionally does go bad all by itself.

    Only about 36% full - I never let my drives get much past 50%. FWIW, I'm still in 10.3.9.

    T

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    7,056

    Default

    FYI, I did more investigating about Hot Zone and found this.

    So Hot Zone is at least in the later versions of Panther too. k

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    ex-Cupertino, CA, USA. Now HU+SRB (Europe).
    Posts
    163

    Default

    I would not hesitate to replace the drive. It's a fairly early Maxtor, not just featuring a 88i8030 Marvell SATA bridge, but likely an early one. Esp. if the bridge is B2P (the last three characters of the bridge chip) you should have better luck by just buying any newer drive.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Hi TeeH,

    i never give up on HD's till they are really dead ! and as for connections coming loose, well it may be possible, but highly improbable (never found one yet on a mac, and i have restored thousands of them)

    i would start looking at corrupt XML preference files, these are used and abused by the system and users all day long, secondly dirty power is a big problem with computers, not to mention forced shutdowns, faulty updates, etc...

    how i love them black colored, Darwin start-up screens, NOT !

    assuming you have backed up all important data, just 'zero the drive' - more times than not, the problems disappear completely

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb

    How many thousands were SATA cables though?

    I have seen a scsi jumper wiggle loose (well, I didn't see it, but you know what I mean), and even where for some reason bent SCSI pin on an LVD connector and yet it didn't break and went in 'even' but didn't work. Even where one set of pins just wouldn't work (and not a SCSI ID conflict) but any other ID was fine.

    So any of the above would fit into the "loose connection" which sometimes means, take out the magnifying glass, and inspect closely.

    I give up when a drive is annoyingly loud, or just doesn't cut it by today's standard in performance (I have a Burly that has old drives so if I need to, I have last year's system and mail).

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Hi TZ,

    hehe, i know what you are saying, but i was just trying to keep it simple, you know how things don't always function in the 'real world' as they are designed too

    with connections to hard drives: there is 'X' amount of friction, that holds the connector to the cable, the more you connect and disconnect these cables, the less friction there is to hold them firmly in place, this results in problems, so it is important people realize that it is not a good practice doing so

    more often than not a problem with a hard drive, is merely a symptom of another problem, that is usually software related, and/or compounded with many hours of running time, e.g. corruption slowly creeping in after years of running

    i regularly reformat my hard drives, and problems that are seemingly unrelated to any immediate problems i am having, just disappear, having a clean new system is often the most important thing

    and about old drives, i have a old Seagate SCSI 1GB, it must be almost 15 years old now, and works faultlessly (nice strong cable connection too), moral of the story: look after your hard drive, and it looks after you...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    155

    Default

    Thanks, folks -

    Good suggestions all. I have a replacement drive in hand (a nice new Seagate.) Don't think I'm going to spend too much time messing around with the old drive - not enough time as is for all the non-computer demands in life...

    I keep a clean system and it's been very reliable (knock wood) I don't really have the patience to "regularly" reformat and re-install, though I guess I would if it was ever really necessary. Let's hope not!

    T

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •