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Thread: SCSI/SAS Controllers

  1. #21
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    Lightbulb SATA Backplane hot-plug

    SATA Backplane = hot-plug?

    The vast majority of applications with SATA components are based on systems with two to four drives and, if necessary, a clear RAID array as well. For several years, decision-makers have had the option of falling back on low-priced products with an UltraATA interface rather than springing for expensive SCSI hardware. However, the former was not geared for intensive long-term operation and was unpopular because of the limited availability of important components, such as hot-swap systems or backplanes.

    Serial ATA has changed everything - not only are the cables easier to manipulate, but the drive ports allow backplanes to be built at a negligible cost.

    We took a look at the backplane solutions available today, to get an impression of the quality of the current SATA component generation. We also looked at host adapters.

    The staggered contacts make the Serial ATA interface well suited for hot plugging in theory, but in practice this was not the case. An appropriate removable bracket or a backplane makes the whole thing waterproof.
    Check out the review: http://www.tomshardware.com/storage/20040426/index.html

  2. #22
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    Lightbulb SATA-II Specifications

    SATA-II Specifications and drives.
    http://www.anandtech.com/storage/showdoc.aspx?i=2454

  3. #23
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    Lightbulb Contact Start-Stop (CSS)

    Hitachi 3.5" HDDs also feature load/unload technology which is commonly used only on 2.5" and smaller form factor mobile drives. Load/unload technology should protect the drive from shocks better than conventional Contact Start-Stop (CSS) drives. Hitachi's load/unload implementation also allows the user to configure time-out values for entering power saving modes that are not available with CSS based drives. While on power saving mode, the platters spin, but the read/write heads are unloaded.

  4. #24
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    Lightbulb NAS and SSC

    Some NAS systems are also incompatibel with drives using SSC.

  5. #25
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    Lightbulb Serial Attached SCSI (SAS)

    For those who like to know what's taking place on technology and product fronts, Tom's Hardware Guide has brought forth a rather lengthy and informative article on Serial Attached SCSI, or "SAS."

    The serial nature of this new product allows some interesting boot and RAID configurations. The corporate world can see some real, serious advantages here for its server farms, and I can envision some advantages to be had for my little network at home. Nonetheless, the information is worth having because it allows you to, once again, imagine what's possible and see part of it being brought to life.

    I do wish engineers would spend more time thinking the matter through, coming up with, developing, producing, and shipping a product that makes the most sense from their point of view on how things should be done.


  6. #26
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    Lightbulb Silicon Image

    FAQ:
    http://www.siliconimage.com/support/supportfaq.aspx

    [PDF] Si 3132 PCI Express to 2-Port Serial ATA II Host Controller
    http://www.siliconimage.com/docs/SI_3132PB_FINAL.pdf

    HD For Indies
    The new Sil 3132(host adapter) and Sil-3726 (port multiplier) are real multipliers for SATA-2 enclosures.
    http://www.hdforindies.com/2005/06/i...didnt-know-how

    sil 3132 sata chip driver - LinuxQuestions.org
    http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...d.php?t=429066

    PDF] SATA II PCIe Pro RAID Quick Installation Guide
    http://www.siig.com/manuals/04-0396A.pdf

  7. #27
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    Lightbulb SATA-II Features/Performance

    HARDCOREWARE
    5.11.05

    SATA-II, 3 Gb/s, and what that means for performance in various RAID configurations
    Myth #1: My drive is a SATA-II drive, because it supports NCQ.
    Myth #2: SATA-II = 3 Gb/s or SATA 300

    Fact: While NCQ is one of the capabilities of the SATA-II spec, it does not automatically make your drive a SATA-II drive. Many SATA drives support NCQ.

    SATA-IO FAQ

    Hitachi does call their drive a SATA-II drive, as it does support all of the newest features, including NCQ, 3 Gb/s, and Staggered Spinup.

  8. #28
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    Lightbulb Which drive supports SATA II

    The drives which have SATA2 support :
    Code:
     
     {Seagate}
     NearLine NL35.2 SATA2 16 NCQ 1.0 500/400/---/---/250/---/---/---/---/---/---/--- ST3...6p.NS
     NearLine NL35.2 SATA2  8 NCQ 1.0 500/400/---/---/250/---/---/---/---/---/---/--- ST3...8p.NS
     Barracuda7200.9 SATA2 16 NCQ     500/400/---/300/250/---/---/---/---/---/---/--- ST3...6p.AS
     Barracuda7200.9 SATA2  8 NCQ     ---/---/---/---/250/200/160/120/080/---/---/--- ST3...8p.AS
     {Western Digital}
     WD Caviar RE    SATA2 16 ??? 1.0 ---/---/---/---/250/---/160/120/---/---/---/--- WD...0YS (ABKS)
     WD Caviar RE    SATA2  8 ??? 1.0 ---/---/---/---/250/---/160/120/---/---/---/--- WD...0SS (ABJS)
     WD Caviar SE16  SATA2 16 ???     500/???/320/300/250/200/160/---/---/---/---/--- WD...0KS (AAKS)
     WD Caviar SE    SATA2  8 ???     ---/???/320/300/250/200/160/120/!JD/---/!JD/--- WD...0JS (AAJS)
     WD Caviar       SATA2  2         ---/---/---/---/250/---/160/---/!BD/---/!BD/--- WD...0BS (AABS)
     {Hitachi}
     Deskstar  7K500 SATA2 16 NCQ     500/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/--- HDS725050KLA360
     Deskstar T7K250 SATA2  8 NCQ     ---/---/---/---/250/200/160/---/---/---/---/--- HDT7225..DLA380
     Deskstar  7K80  SATA2  8 NCQ     ---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/080/---/---/--- HDS728080PLA380
     Deskstar  7K80  SATA2  2 NCQ     ---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/040/--- HDS728040PLA320
     {Samsung}
     SpinPoint T133  SATA2  8 NCQ 0.6 ---/400/---/300/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/--- HD...LJ
     SpinPoint P120  SATA2  8 NCQ 0.6 ---/---/---/---/250/200/---/---/---/---/---/--- SP2.04C
     SpinPoint P80SD SATA2  8 NCQ 0.6 ---/---/---/---/---/---/160/120/080/---/040/--- HD....J
     {Maxtor}
     MaXLine   Pro   SATA2 16 NCQ 1.0 500/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/--- 7H500F0
     MaXLine  +III   SATA2 16 NCQ 1.0 ---/---/---/300/250/---/---/---/---/---/---/--- 7V...F0
     QuickView 500   SATA2 16 NCQ     500/400/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/--- 3H...F0
     DiamondMax 11   SATA2 16 NCQ     500/400/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/--- 6H...F0
     DiamondMax 10   SATA2 16 NCQ     ---/---/320/300/250/---/---/---/---/---/---/--- 6V...F0
     DiamondMax 10   SATA2  8 NCQ     ---/---/---/---/---/200/160/---/080/---/---/--- 6V...E0
     {Excelstor}
     JupiterCallisto SATA2  8         ---/---/---/---/---/---/---/---/080/---/---/--- J880S
    Forums: SR

  9. #29
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    Lightbulb Seagate 15K Savvio SAS

    Seagate's Next 15K RPM Drive 2007-01-16
    Today Seagate announces the Savvio 15K, a drive that combines the benefits introduced with the 10K RPM Savvio with a 15,000 RPM spindle speed.

    Seagate has already demonstrated a firm belief in the 2.5” form-factor’s smaller size, lower power consumption, higher IOps, and greater reliability by phasing out the “legacy” 3.5” 10K drive (Cheetah 10K) in favor of the smaller Savvio 10K.

    The Savvio 15K represents a move by the company to be first out the door with an ultra-high speed 2.5” drive and promises to deliver a previously unachievable balance between seek times and spindle counts.

    Seagate’s newest, equipped with the SAS interface, will ship in 36 and 73 GB capacities and features a 2.9 ms seek time with a 16 MB buffer.

    In addition to claiming outright faster performance, Seagate also makes a case for the Savvio 15K being a more efficient storage solution than 3.5" SCSI drives. Thanks to its smaller form factor, Seagate says, the Savvio 15K can offer higher performance per rack, per gigabyte, and per watt. Seagate even says the drive should be more reliable—by virtue of its newer design—than its 3.5" Cheetah SCSI drives.

    The drives will come with a 16MB cache and a SAS interface, and they appear to compare well with Seagate's existing Cheetah 15K.5. The 73GB Cheetah, for example, has a 3.5ms seek time, consumes 8.4W, and has a MTBF of 1.4 million hours. The 73GB Savvio 15K has a seek time of 2.9ms, consumes only 5.8W, and enjoys a MTBF of 1.6 million hours. There's no word on how much the new Savvio 15K drives will cost when they hit the channel.

  10. #30
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    Lightbulb Seagate 15K Savvio SAS

    [img]images/icons/icon3.gif[/img] Seagate 15K Savvio SAS

    Seagate's Next 15K RPM Drive 2007-01-16
    Today Seagate announces the Savvio 15K, a drive that combines the benefits introduced with the 10K RPM Savvio with a 15,000 RPM spindle speed.

    Seagate has already demonstrated a firm belief in the 2.5” form-factor’s smaller size, lower power consumption, higher IOps, and greater reliability by phasing out the “legacy” 3.5” 10K drive (Cheetah 10K) in favor of the smaller Savvio 10K.

    The Savvio 15K represents a move by the company to be first out the door with an ultra-high speed 2.5” drive and promises to deliver a previously unachievable balance between seek times and spindle counts.

    Seagate’s newest, equipped with the SAS interface, will ship in 36 and 73 GB capacities and features a 2.9 ms seek time with a 16 MB buffer.

    In addition to claiming outright faster performance, Seagate also makes a case for the Savvio 15K being a more efficient storage solution than 3.5" SCSI drives. Thanks to its smaller form factor, Seagate says, the Savvio 15K can offer higher performance per rack, per gigabyte, and per watt. Seagate even says the drive should be more reliable—by virtue of its newer design—than its 3.5" Cheetah SCSI drives.

    The drives will come with a 16MB cache and a SAS interface, and they appear to compare well with Seagate's existing Cheetah 15K.5. The 73GB Cheetah, for example, has a 3.5ms seek time, consumes 8.4W, and has a MTBF of 1.4 million hours. The 73GB Savvio 15K has a seek time of 2.9ms, consumes only 5.8W, and enjoys a MTBF of 1.6 million hours. There's no word on how much the new Savvio 15K drives will cost when they hit the channel.

  11. #31
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    Lightbulb Sata III

    Serial ATA III on Track

    During the last IDF, Intel unveiled part of the specification of the Serial ATA III. Data transfer speed will be doubled to reach the theoretical barrier of 600MB/s.

    it will also expend the recently announced new connector formats aiming to enhance the use of SATA format in storage array or mobile optical swap bay (especially the slimline and micro-SATA connector for 1.8" drives).

    SATAIII should allow users to add several SATAIII devices on the same SATA line. This function will be either implemented at the motherboard level, or via port multiplicators expansion cards.

    Completion of SATAIII specifications is expected for H2 2007, roughly at the same time than the first SSDs should hit the shelves. If 3.5" HDs will never reach theoretical barriers of SATAII or SATA III, flash memory-based storage units will strongly benefit of SATAIII, especially concerning diversity of connectors.

  12. #32
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    Lightbulb Cheetah NS 10K

    Seagate spins out Cheetah NS hard drive

    Today Seagate takes the wraps off a new addition to its SCSI hard drive family designed to increase capacity and reduce power consumption while sacrificing as little performance as possible.

    This latest drive, dubbed the Cheetah NS, is identical to Seagate's top-of-the-line Cheetah 15K.5 with one important exception: while the 15K.5 spins at 15,000 RPM, the NS only turns at 10,000 RPM.

    With the exception of its slower spindle and some changes to the drive head to tune it for operation with a 10K-RPM platter, the Cheetah NS is mechanically identical to the 15K.5.

    at 10K RPM, the Cheetah NS packs 400GB onto those same four platters. Even the math works out nicely: for a 33% drop in spindle speed, Seagate gets a 33% increase in capacity.

    In addition to increasing storage capacity, turning down the Cheetah's spindle speed also reduces the drive's power consumption. According to Seagate, the Cheetah NS consumes 34% less power at idle and 33% less during normal operation than its native 10K-RPM products. That makes sense because the drive is using smaller physical disks than its native 10K-RPM counterparts, and smaller platters mean less weight to spin.

    Seagate says the NS is more reliable than its native 10K-RPM parts, too. The NS's unrecoverable error rate is apparently ten times better than that of the 10K-RPM Cheetah, and its annualized failure rate is supposedly 17% lower.

    So the Cheetah NS has more capacity, consumes less power, and is potentially more reliable.

    But what about performance? Seagate says the drive is 21% faster than its 10K-RPM competition, and with a 3.9 millisecond average seek time and 97MB/s sustained data rate, it beats the Cheetah 10K.7 by 0.7 milliseconds and 17MB/s, respectively.

    The drive is working with smaller platters, confining data to a tighter physical area that's quicker to navigate. Throw in a drive head that's already faster because it's designed for a 15K-RPM platter, and the Cheetah NS should be faster overall than comparable 10K-RPM drives.

    Seagate is already shipping the Cheetah NS to partners and expects to have drives in the distribution channel in the third quarter of this year. There's no word on final pricing, though.

  13. #33
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    Lightbulb ATTO ExpressSAS H380 and H308

    ATTO intros new SAS host adapters

    ATTO Technology has announced the ExpressSAS H380 and H308 SAS host adapters, additions to its existing family of SAS adapters.

    The H380 and H308 models use the PCI Express Intel IOC340 I/O Processor with integrated XScale to deliver claimed transfer rates of up to 3 Gigabits per second per port.

    The units also allows users to connect to both SAS (Serial Attached SCSI) and SATA II (Serial ATA) devices. Both units feature a low-profile design, and the ExpressSAS H380 offers connectivity through two external x4 MiniSAS SFF8088 connectors, while the H308 model utilizes two internal x4 MiniSAS SFF8087 connectors supporting up to 256 devices when connected through SAS Expanders.

    Each of the eight ports on the ExpressSAS adapter is capable of delivering up to 300 megabytes per second performance. ATTO officials said "(That's) enough to handle the most demanding applications such as 2K and 4K film, multiple layers of complex, uncompressed real-time effects, and high-definition video editing."

    The new ExpressSAS host adaptors will be generally available this fall. Pricing information was not disclosed.

    http://www.attotech.com/

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