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Thread: Database Servers

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Database Servers

    If you use your OS X machine with Apache, PHP, Perl, and/or MySQL to do real web serving for fun or profit, I wanna hear from you.

    I run a Yosemite G4/400 with 640MB RAM and a Fujitsu 20GB IDE drive, Apache, PHP4, and MySQL.

    I have dyndns.org dynamic domain forwarding, which lets me run this server at home behind a Linksys switch/router with a firewall, off a DHCP cable connection, and have a consistent URL despite my ISP's changing my IP address occasionally.

    I am still learning the intricacies of UNIX administration, groups, and throwing files around.

    My only conundrum right now has to do with port numbers. I can't get ftp to work for anyone outside my LAN in to my server. I think this is b/c passive FTP allocates ports in the high 40000 numbers after receiving a request for a connection on 20 or 21. Anyone know anything about this???

  2. #2
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    Default

    ripper, found this @ DynDNS. It seems mostly directed towards NAT-based solutions, mainly meaning that you have to set "Port Forwarding"-rules. I don't know if your router will allow this, but that's all I scraped up.

    Sorry I couldn't be any more help. My main strengths lie in recording audio on a Mac, not setting up servers. Thanks to this site and many Linux ones, I am starting to learn a little bit about networking in general, but not as much as I probably should.

    Good Luck!

    ------------------
    Bill

    "I made a conscience decision in a semi-conscious state"

  3. #3
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    One assumes you've opened server:20,21 to/from any-host:any-port outside.

    ----
    I wonder if you need to allow

    outside:20,21 -> server:40000-65535

    in your firewall router. This, of course, leaves one open for anyone outside to set a from port of 20 or 21 and pass traffic your way on any port on the server above 39999, assuming there was anything they could do that way.

    I'm not thrilled with this one.

    ----
    Can an outsider connect and get through login, but not transfer files? If that's the case, which fails: GET? PUT? DIR? all of those?

    ----
    Are you running your ftpd with its -r flag set? That would force it to use data-ports in the high range instead of port 20, which you allow through your router. Unset -r and see if that does the trick. (I really like this one if it's the problem!)


    Jazzbo

  4. #4
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    Jazz, bill: thanks for the quick responses. Unfortunately, the problem is gnarly-er than I explained. (I was and am still hoping to dredge up some New Talent sysadmins to widen my geek knowledge pool...)

    My Linksys switch/router uses NAT. I run a client on the Yose that check the public IP address every so often and updates dyndns.org servers when it changes. (Interestingly, it doesn't change that much. Like, once a month.)

    I use Port Forwarding to run the server. I forward ports 20-23, 80, 8080, 3306, and 6700-6701 to the server box. As I understand it, 20 and 21 are FTP, 23 is telnet, 80 (and 8080 on mine, since my ISP blocks port 80 requests through its hardware... bastards!) are HTTP, 3306 is MySQL, and 6700-6701 are something else. I may have the latter two sets of ports mixed up, but you get the point.

    Note: I also run email clients on the 9500, and, get this...
    AOL Instant Messenger on both machines. I have no idea how this works right, unless it uses some kind of unique machine ID cookie sent with the message. IM won't allow the same username to connect simultaneously on two machines, so it kicks me off the 9500 when I log in on the Yose, but messages flow through the router to both machines (and my roommate's PC, also on the Linksys) unimpeded.

    I did try forwarding a large range of ports in the 40000+ range to the server, and subsequently got ftp to work to the server via command-line ftp client from my buddy's OS 10 machine in Terminal. Transmit (ftp client) never did connect, though. He uploaded files and directories successfully, and he noticed that it kept assigning him unique port numbers above 40,000 for each transfer. We deduced that ftpd takes connections on 20/21, and then opens high-range ports to do the passive transfer, freeing it to use 20/1 for new connections. Is this correct?

    The kicker was, when I opened up those ports, I thrashed email and IM on my 9500 and roommate's machines. So they must use high-range ports sometimes, too!!! I guess I really need to start using more in-depth admin utilities... where should I start?

    ps. Jazz: I want to try your suggestion. How do I play with the ftpd settings? I've never manually started ftpd.

  5. #5
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    I believe that all of the chat-ish protocols use UDP and specific port. Since you're NATting, from the Internet side it's all the same IP-port combination, which is why two sessions from hosts the inside of your firewall bounce each other off -- looks like the same host-port pair from outside.

    What should happen is that ftp data port connections move up into the dynamic range to stay out of the way of the listener (20/21). I just checked my inetd.conf file (it governs *most* TCP and UDP service listeners on most Unix hosts) and found that the default is without -r, so that's not your problem. (cat /etc/inetd.conf in Terminal to inspect it.)

    Also, if you told the NATting router to pass all ports above 39999 to your OSX machine, none of the dynamic ports spun up on any other LAN host would be reachable from the outside, which would certainly unplug any other host from a lot of Internet communications. High-number ports are set up on demand for lots and lots of data exchanges.

    You might try having the outside client run the connection in active mode instead of passive. Either ftp -A yourhost.domain or issue the passive command during the ftp dialogue, watching for it to be reported as "passive: off". This should result in the client machine providing the dynamic port for your ftpd to connect to and pass data.

    I just don't know enough about running ftp servers behind NATting routers to get you much farther right away. I have a feeling things won't work at all if the outside client is also behind a firewall.

    You might see if you can find anything on Linksys's web pages (or elsewhere) describing how to set up an ftp server NATted behind one of their routers.

    Jazzbo

    [This message has been edited by Jazzbo (edited 28 January 2003).]

  6. #6
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    Some discussions of note...

    I thought this one at landfield while quite applicable, didn't seem to generate an answer.

    This one at dslreports does a nice job of explaining active vs. passive mode. One of its links suggests that Linksys hasn't implemented enough FTP server handling to do the job at all.

    Note that if you add the internal IP address of your OSX to the Linksys as a "DMZ" machine, I believe that opens all ports not explicitly closed to be passed to it. Tighten that puppy down!

    Jazzbo

  7. #7
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    Yeah, I'm definitely not using DMZ. That's for newbies who are confused by port forwarding and trying to run QuakeIII Server, or hackers who are explicitly trying to work on a given box.

  8. #8
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    "That's for newbies who are confused by port forwarding" or for Internet service architects running a hardened proxy-server. In a past life I fronted a multi-national with such a Unix box, though I certainly didn't go it alone!

    While they're tricky to set up correctly and require stringency a la Gregoire, DMZ hosts can be tremendously effective at both communications and defense.

    Jazzbo

  9. #9
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    A list of applications that offer a friendlier, graphic interface for MySQL database work:

    MySQLMan
    Eskuel
    CocoaMySQL
    YourSQL
    phpMyAdmin
    Navicat
    FMPro Migrator
    Digital Image MySQL
    MySQL Magic
    MacSQL

    [See also Apple MySQL note ]
    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=106383

  10. #10
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    Part II: XServe G5 Panther ComputerWorld

    quote:
    Focusing solely on the hardware, the new Xserve just wows me. It has one or two 2-GHz G5 processors, uses 400-MHz ECC RAM and has a dedicated front-side bus running at 1 GHz (the dual-processor model has two independent front-side buses, one for each processor). Add to that the ability to support up to 8GB of RAM, and you have the makings of the fastest Mac ever conceived. But Apple didn't stop there. Each of the three drive modules contains dedicated 150MB/sec. controllers, and the Xserve supports 100- and 133-MHz PCI-X cards. Rounding out its impressive technology pedigree are two onboard Gigabit Ethernet ports, each with its own dedicated controller.

    What does all that power mean? A machine that is up to 60% faster than the original Xserve, which was a powerhouse in its own right. Compared with similar server platforms, the Xserve G5 offers more sheer computational power for straight high-end computing tasks. <>

    <snip>

    But sheer power isn't what impresses me most. That accolade goes to its ease of configuration, monitoring and maintenance. A stock Xserve out of the box is impressive, but it ships with only a single 80GB drive. Adding drives to the Xserve is impressively easy. Simply pop out one of the three hot plug drive modules, put a new drive in it (up to 250GB at present), pop the module back in, and you're ready to go. No powering down the server, no messy opening it up, just pop out and pop back in, with no downtime whatsoever.

    More...

  11. #11
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    Apple posted KB of what 3rd party hardware is supported on XRAID.

    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=107911

  12. #12
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    Linux kernel 2.6 for SMP was able to show 89% boost in file system performance and a huge boost in MySQL, which is used to run a lot of BBSs on the net.

    quote:
    Linux Kernel Comparison: 2.6.4 vs. 2.4.25 - Conclusion
    Published on 2004-03-29 01:00:00 By: Jim_

    With the major improvements that we've seen in Samba over the last couple of years, testing Linux file server performance certainly seems like a good idea. Countless Unix and Linux administrators roll out Linux boxes running Samba to handle file serving needs. It's an inexpensive way to accomplish a fundamental IT need, networked storage.

    Keeping all this in mind, I decided to play around with dbench for the first time. It's a pretty slick little benchmark that generates load patterns similar to Netbench, a commercial benchmark. What really makes it easy to use is the fact that you don't need a lab full of client machines to stress your server. How does kernel 2.6 measure up when it comes to file server performance?

    Woah (/Keanu Reeves). This one shocked me enough to run this test over and over again in an attempt to find a mistake on my part that could explain this huge gap in performance. 2.6 completely obliterates 2.4 in this benchmark by approximately 89%! That's truly remarkable. I don't think I really have to comment any further do I? You folks know what kernel to choose if your server is going to be acting as a file server. Just look at that graph...

    Conclusion

    Initially I had much grander plans for this article. I was going to run the benchmarks not only on the high-end dual Xeon box, but also on a slightly older and considerably slower machine (Celeron 633 w/ 256MB memory) as well. Unfortunately I encountered some difficulty with the older hardware and was unable to bring you those results.

    While this topic has been covered by many others in the past, I felt it prudent to take a look at the differences in kernel performance for those of us with multiple processor machines under our control. At 2CPU.com, we try to take care of the SMPers out there, and performing comparisons such as this are certainly solid steps in that direction.

    As far as our results go, I can't say that I was really surprised. Whenever you're dealing with a new kernel series you expect performance with its predecessor to be quite close in certain applications and vastly superior in others. It would be an invalid expectation to assume performance gains in every situation as a lot of the time performance is clearly dependent on how the application is written. I think this is clearly the case with our picCOLOR results.

    The considerable gains shown in MySQL read and write performance certainly have my head spinning as we do have busy forums which rely on MySQL's affection. If you just looked at those numbers, you'd probably think I'd be crazy not to make the jump to kernel 2.6 on our web server. However, our content management system does generate our articles as static HTML, so I have to keep that performance in mind. 2.4 bested 2.6 in this area, so this definitely complicates my decision making process.
    http://www.2cpu.com/articles/98_5.html

  13. #13
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    First stuff first:

    G5 Xserve in the house!

    Yahoo!!!

    Hi jacob,

    Funny you ask. This SP G5 Xserve is going to be exactly what you are thinking about - FM Server 5.5v4 for (at peak) about 100 users, about 30 Files, most smallish but a couple large. Large as in approaching the 2 GB file size limit in FM Server currently.

    Current FM server is not CPU intensive. Baically, it is a file locking device, and a backup scheduler, with a few other goodies like caching in the mix. Almost all the work happens on the client side, within the FM Pro application. So no problem with a SP G5, or even a SP G4. Our current box for this is a DP 1G G4 and as viewed through Top, CPU is about 80% idle. We only buy the better boxes for maximum I/O performance. FM has a good white paper about optimizing FM Server/Best Practices, and they recommond you spend your $$ on fast I/O - like current SCSI or FC - not on CPU or memory.

    The next version, FileMaker Server 7 will be CPU intensive, as most work will happen on the server, more like a traditional SQL DB. Supposed to be wicked fast provided the hardware is up to snuff. FM Pro 7 is out already, but Server 7 will not be out till middle/end of summer, maybe later.

    So if you plan to migrate up to Server 7 soon, go fastest DP; if not, decent SP is plenty. We figure it may be up to a year before we get live files on Server 7, so we will buy the DP 3G G5 (G6?)Xserve available then.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

  14. #14
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    Arrow dbSuite MySQL Admin Tool

    dbSuite Administration Tool for MySQL is an integrated environment for administering local and remote MySQL database servers. It includes monitoring and administration of system settings, monitoring of server performance, management of users and access privileges, database access and navigation, creation and editing of tables, SQL queries and commands, and other features. dbSuite Administration Tool for MySQL is free for private use (donations requested) for Mac OS X and Windows. A $59 commercial license is also available.

  15. #15
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    Default Oracle 10g, FileMaker Server

    With almost unlimited data hosting capacity, new server software is easier
    to use, improves performance of shared database, and more secure.


    Santa Clara, Ca., May 24, 2004

    FileMaker has announced the immediateavailability of
    FileMaker Server 7 (http://store.filemaker.com/r1.html),
    the new server software for hosting FileMaker Pro 7 database files.

    "Whether you're a 2-person small business or a large corporate workgroup,
    FileMaker Server 7 allows you to easily share, manage and access database
    information with others while dramatically increasing productivity," says
    Ryan Rosenberg, vice president, Marketing and Services, FileMaker.

    FileMaker Server 7 now offers numerous breakthroughs in data sharing and
    administration, as well as advanced security features, including the
    following new features:

    FileMaker databases run faster

    New within FileMaker Server 7 is the ability to perform searches and
    calculations on the server instead of the client database providing data
    speed gains; get greater performance from hard disk storage systems and
    multi-CPU servers; while taking advantage of large amounts of RAM using
    sophisticated caching.

    Host virtually unlimited amounts of data

    Each of the 125 database files that can be hosted on FileMaker Server 7 can
    store up to 8 terabytes of information - 4,000 times the old limit. And,
    because each FileMaker database file can now contain multiple data tables,
    a single FileMaker Server can host thousands of data tables. For added
    scalability, users can add FileMaker Servers to their network as their
    business needs grow.

    Easy database administration from anywhere

    The new FileMaker Server 7 Administration Tool (SAT) allows users to
    accomplish the following tasks, either locally at the Server station or
    remotely over a network: Perform maintenance on live databases, including
    live backups while the file is in use; Automate unattended, scheduled
    backup; Audit remote administration through a new Event Log entry that
    identifies Administrators and their activities; Ensure that all clients have
    the most current plug-ins using the Auto Update feature; Record plug-in
    downloads in the Event log; and change server settings without restarting
    the server.

    Better data protection with new security features

    FileMaker Server 7 provides three new key security functions: account
    authentication management for reducing the overhead of managing user
    accounts and passwords, using industry standards provided by Active
    Directory (Windows) and Open Directory (Mac OS); Database visibility control
    for filtering the display of hosted database names based on the users'
    privileges to protect sensitive information; and data encryption to enhance
    the security of FileMaker information that is transferred between hosted
    databases and desktop clients via Secure Socket Layer (SSL) encryption.

    Pricing and availability

    FileMaker Server 7, priced at $999/$499 upgrade (U.S., Suggested List
    Price), is shipping to FileMaker volume license customers starting today.
    The company plans to begin shipping retail units to all other customers and
    distribution partners June 2. Customers can place pre-orders now for
    FileMaker Server 7 by phone (1-800-325-2747) or online with select resellers
    at http://store.filemaker.com/r1.html. Licensed users of FileMaker Server
    5.5, 5.0 or FileMaker Pro Server 3.0, 2.1 may upgrade to FileMaker Server 7
    at just US$499, a 50% savings off the regular price. This offer is valid
    from May 24, 2004, to September 17, 2004, in the U.S. and Canada. After that
    date, only licensed users of FileMaker Server 5.5 will be eligible for the
    US $499 upgrade price.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

  16. #16
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    Posts
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    Default FileMaker Server 7 available - Big News

    With almost unlimited data hosting capacity, new server software is easier
    to use, improves performance of shared database, and more secure.


    Santa Clara, Ca., May 24, 2004

    FileMaker has announced the immediateavailability of
    FileMaker Server 7 (http://store.filemaker.com/r1.html),
    the new server software for hosting FileMaker Pro 7 database files.

    "Whether you're a 2-person small business or a large corporate workgroup,
    FileMaker Server 7 allows you to easily share, manage and access database
    information with others while dramatically increasing productivity," says
    Ryan Rosenberg, vice president, Marketing and Services, FileMaker.

    FileMaker Server 7 now offers numerous breakthroughs in data sharing and
    administration, as well as advanced security features, including the
    following new features:

    FileMaker databases run faster

    New within FileMaker Server 7 is the ability to perform searches and
    calculations on the server instead of the client database providing data
    speed gains; get greater performance from hard disk storage systems and
    multi-CPU servers; while taking advantage of large amounts of RAM using
    sophisticated caching.

    Host virtually unlimited amounts of data

    Each of the 125 database files that can be hosted on FileMaker Server 7 can
    store up to 8 terabytes of information - 4,000 times the old limit. And,
    because each FileMaker database file can now contain multiple data tables,
    a single FileMaker Server can host thousands of data tables. For added
    scalability, users can add FileMaker Servers to their network as their
    business needs grow.

    Easy database administration from anywhere

    The new FileMaker Server 7 Administration Tool (SAT) allows users to
    accomplish the following tasks, either locally at the Server station or
    remotely over a network: Perform maintenance on live databases, including
    live backups while the file is in use; Automate unattended, scheduled
    backup; Audit remote administration through a new Event Log entry that
    identifies Administrators and their activities; Ensure that all clients have
    the most current plug-ins using the Auto Update feature; Record plug-in
    downloads in the Event log; and change server settings without restarting
    the server.

    Better data protection with new security features

    FileMaker Server 7 provides three new key security functions: account
    authentication management for reducing the overhead of managing user
    accounts and passwords, using industry standards provided by Active
    Directory (Windows) and Open Directory (Mac OS); Database visibility control
    for filtering the display of hosted database names based on the users'
    privileges to protect sensitive information; and data encryption to enhance
    the security of FileMaker information that is transferred between hosted
    databases and desktop clients via Secure Socket Layer (SSL) encryption.

    Pricing and availability

    FileMaker Server 7, priced at $999/$499 upgrade (U.S., Suggested List
    Price), is shipping to FileMaker volume license customers starting today.
    The company plans to begin shipping retail units to all other customers and
    distribution partners June 2. Customers can place pre-orders now for
    FileMaker Server 7 by phone (1-800-325-2747) or online with select resellers
    at http://store.filemaker.com/r1.html. Licensed users of FileMaker Server
    5.5, 5.0 or FileMaker Pro Server 3.0, 2.1 may upgrade to FileMaker Server 7
    at just US$499, a 50% savings off the regular price. This offer is valid
    from May 24, 2004, to September 17, 2004, in the U.S. and Canada. After that
    date, only licensed users of FileMaker Server 5.5 will be eligible for the
    US $499 upgrade price.
    "Imagine if every Thursday your shoes exploded if you tied them the usual way. This happens to us all the time with computers, and nobody thinks of complaining." -- Jef Raskin

  17. #17
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    Lightbulb Apple's Xsan reviewed

    From ComputerWorld:
    The visible SAN from Apple
    Tom Yager, InfoWorld
    26/05/2004 09:43:22

    * First, Xsan http://www.apple.com/xsan/ is really a SAN file system, which makes SANs useful and accessible beyond their core capabilities.

    * And second, Xsan is precisely the right way to turn inexpensive disk arrays (like Xserve RAID) into shared, consolidated network storage.

    * Here's the elevator pitch: Xsan does the SAN thing, consolidating and virtualizing storage.

    * But Xsan presents that storage in its most readily usable form, as disks that are partitioned into OS X HFS+ (HFS second-generation) volumes.

    * Each of Xsan's virtual volumes permits simultaneous read/write use by multiple servers.

    * Xsan puts SAN file systems within the reach of midsize businesses and high-demand workgroups or server clusters.

    * The initial buy-in is manageable at around $35,000 for the Xserves, Xserve RAID, Xsan software, FC (Fibre Channel) network adapters, and the fiber switch needed to get a 3TB Xsan running.

    * After that, you can join Xserve, Xserve G5, Power Mac G4, and Power Mac G5 systems to the Xsan for a flat $999 per machine plus the cost of the FC adapter.

    * You can add Xserve RAID storage to your heart's content as long as you have open ports on your fiber switches.

    * There is no cost associated with publishing traditional OS X, Unix, or Windows shared folders from Xsan servers.

    * What gives me pause is Apple's professional services network. Xsan is, by far, the most complex technology that Apple has produced.

    * Only a percentage of Apple dealers and consultants will have the skill to configure, expand, and support Xsan.

    * Although Xsan should be a solution that opens SANs to those who can't afford them, it's going to be a do-it-yourself exercise until dealers get up to speed.

    * There's a yellow flag here. But I got Xsan in 90 minutes over the phone with almost no understanding of SAN file systems.

    If you can give up "plug, play, and don't touch" in favor of five or six figures' worth of reduced buy-in and upgrade costs, rolling up your sleeves might seem less inconvenient.

    ComputerWorld: Apple Xsan
    Last edited by TZ; 05-26-2004 at 09:31 AM. Reason: http://www.apple.com/xsan/

  18. #18
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    Arrow XServe G5 2.0DP & XRAID

    This is a really good, well-done review of the latest XServe and XRAID from Apple and would help anyone contemplating either for their data center or other environment. I think its also nice to see yet another review coming from ComputerWorld, too.
    Apple's G5 Serve/XRAID

  19. #19
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    Default No SSH Connection

    No SSH Connection Connecting To Server

    Peter Trist
    I have noticed a similar problem to Chris on my home-office LAN. Connecting in either direction between my iBook and iMac since updating to 10.3.4 gives me the same notification.

    Somewhat frustrating. I have been unable to find any ref to this new 'feature' on Apple's site after doing numerous searches over the last few days since updating. I originally applied the 10.3.4 standard update but have since downloaded and applied the 10.3.4 update over that to make sure I got the minor bits not included in the base update that are in the combo version.

    Can't remember exactly what the diffs were at this time, but memory says one or two were security fix related.


    Rene Borgella Jr.
    Chris Leuty reports that he can no longer make a secure connections via "SSH after upgrading to 10.3.4. The error message reads: "Can't make a secure connection to .... The server... does not support secure connections via SSH. To connect with reduced security click Continue."

    <>This is exactly what we've seen on all our machines upgraded to 10.3.4 Seems this is a bug to me.

    Daniel Figucio
    Only Mac OS X Server can be connected to via AFP over SSH - AND you have to enable it at the server end. You cannot connect to a Mac OS X Client with AFP over SSH. What used to happen was that the attempted connection would fail and it would connect without using SSH without letting you know. Now it lets you know... So in reality, its a feature improvement, as it plugs a security issue.

    -----------------

    sounds like Apple wants you to buy OS X Server, rather than using the Client version, for server operations?


  20. #20
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    Default Oracle10g for XServe G5

    Executives at Oracle and Apple are taking to the highway in a series of international road shows to introduce Oracle Database 10g on Mac OS X Server, which is Apple's Unix-based server operating system.

    "The power of the new Xserve G5 and the flexibility of Oracle Database 10g running on Apple's Unix-based Mac OS X Server will deliver our joint customers a very compelling, cost-effective, scalable and reliable database solution," Milani said at the time.
    http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,,1606918,00.asp

    Oracle9i already runs on OS X:
    http://otn.oracle.com/software/produ...e9i/index.html
    http://oracle.com

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