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Thread: G5 General References

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    Lightbulb PPC 970FX User Guide

    Here's the block diagrams. Dual G5s with PCI-X,

      

    Rev A and B G5s:
    The old systems had the original Uni-N 3.0 northbridge chip, otherwise known as just "U3". The new models have U3H (U3 Heavy), a newer revision of U3 which first showed up in XServe G5.

    The new dual 1.8 uses U3 with the K2 southbridge. The iMac G5 and the new single 1.8 both use U3-Lite with the Shasta southbridge.

    In general the U3-Lite + Shasta combo is designed for lower power, lower performance, and lower price than U3/U3H + K2. U3-Lite only has a single processor bus and a single DDR DRAM channel, whereas U3 and U3H have two of each.
    G5 motherboard variations
    IBM POWER 970FX User Guide (pdf)

    Last edited by TZ; 10-11-2005 at 10:20 AM.

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    Lightbulb Tiger Preview Features

    Migration Assistant: Mac OS X 10.4 - Part 17

    Migration Assistant is one of these applications that set Mac OS X apart from the rest of the crowd. It saves valuable time, lots of it, and it saves on aggravation and anxiety because when you need to migrate a system manually --as you must with every currently available OS-- thereźs always the risk that you have forgotten something hidden but very important. One of those hidden things that come to my mind, is the license file of Maya. Forgetting to migrate that one means asking for another license file, which always makes me look silly in the eyes of the Alias chap who must generate the file or number for me.

    Migration Assistant is unobtrusive; it gets by, hardly noticed, but it is one of those applications that have made a name for Apple in the area of ease-of-use and letting the computer work for you instead of the other way round.

    OS X 10.4 Server and Client

    Tiger being closer to reality
    Last edited by TZ; 03-08-2005 at 09:44 AM.

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    Lightbulb G5 970mp

    To feed a dualcore processor, one will have to increase the memory bandwidth with i.e. the expensive DDR2 PC6400 (DDR2-800) allowing a data flow rate of 6.4GB/s. With the current double-channel architecture, one will end-up with 12.8GB/s.

    - PCI Express video is expected in order to accommodate with the last set of GPUs from ATI and nVidia (ATI X1x00 and nVidia GeForce 7800GTX), especially if one could finally use the power of those last generation GPUs for boosting CoreImage and Core Video.

    PCI Express to kill off AGP
    Intel PCI-Express roadmap
    Review PCI-Express video
    PCI Express II
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCIe
    Last edited by TZ; 10-14-2005 at 08:23 AM.

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    Lightbulb

    Here's the block diagrams. Dual G5 PCI and the single processor crippleware G5:




    G5 PCI only:
    The iMac G5 and the new dual 2.0 both use U3-Lite with the Shasta southbridge.

    In general the U3-Lite + Shasta combo is designed for lower power, lower performance, and lower price than U3/U3H + K2. U3-Lite only has a single processor bus and a single DDR DRAM channel, whereas U3 and U3H have two of each.
    G5 motherboard variations

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    Lightbulb Single core vs Dual core

    When trying to decide what to get, a good look at the options.
    http://www.barefeats.com/dc20.html
    Barefeats: Dual-Core vs. Quad-Core G5

    Benchmarks Include information on video, RAM, cpu intensive tasks.

    Here is Dual 2.7 Cinebench score:

    CINEBENCH 2003 v1
    ************************************************** **
    Processor : PowerMac G5 Dual
    MHz : 2.7
    Number of CPUs : 2
    Operating System : 10.4.2

    Graphics Card : ATI 9650 256MB
    Resolution : 1680x1050
    Color Depth : millions
    ************************************************** **
    Rendering (Single CPU): 385 CB-CPU
    Rendering (Multiple CPU): 663 CB-CPU

    Multiprocessor Speedup: 1.72

    Shading (CINEMA 4D) : 359 CB-GFX
    Shading (OpenGL Software Lighting) : 1028 CB-GFX
    Shading (OpenGL Hardware Lighting) : 1736 CB-GFX

    OpenGL Speedup: 4.83
    ************************************************** **
    Here is Quad G5 Cinebench score:

    CINEBENCH 2003 v1
    ************************************************** **

    Processor : Quad G5
    MHz : 2.5 GHZ
    Number of CPUs : 4
    Operating System : 10.4.2

    Graphics Card : GeForce 6600
    Resolution :
    Color Depth :
    ************************************************** **
    Rendering (Single CPU): 359 CB-CPU
    Rendering (Multiple CPU): 1016 CB-CPU

    Multiprocessor Speedup: 2.83

    Shading (CINEMA 4D) : 353 CB-GFX
    Shading (OpenGL Software Lighting) : 1051 CB-GFX
    Shading (OpenGL Hardware Lighting) : 1871 CB-GFX

    OpenGL Speedup: 5.29
    ************************************************** **
    Last edited by TZ; 11-11-2005 at 09:48 AM.

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    Lightbulb Choosing faster memory

    Discussion of new Power Mac G5 memory details prompted some follow-ups, too:

    [Michael McGuire, pointing out Apple's PowerMacG5Late2005_TechBrief.pdf]

    "Up to 16GB of main memory Eight DIMM slots hold up to 16GB of fast new 533MHz DDR2 SDRAM. For mission-critical and compute-intensive environments, you now have the option of ECC (Error Correction Code) memory for automatic correction and detection of data errors." - Page #4

    "For users in mission-critical and compute-intensive environments, there's also the option of ECC (Error Correction Code) main memory, which allows automatic correction of single-bit errors and detection of multiple-bit errors." - Page #11

    [Norm LeMieux] ...there's potentially another issue with DDR2 that may not have existed before for Macs: high-speed memories. If you look at Crucial's Quad-compatible modules (1GB), you'll see PC2-4200 modules with 4-4-4-10 timing at the top, followed by PC2-5300 modules (which are CL=5 @ 667MHz, but probably 4-4-4-10 @ 533MHz). This is the performance when the modules are powered by the standard voltage of 1.8V.

      The high-performance Ballistix modules can do 3-3-3-12 @ 533MHz, but they require a higher voltage: 2.1V. This is fine if you have control over your memory rail, but the Mac does not. And since the SPDs are programmed with "JEDEC-standard PC2-4200 values", the OS is just going to program the memory controller to run the same (4-4-4-10). Thus, there's no point [currently, on the Mac] is buying the high-performance modules which are $160 more per 2GB kit.

      Crucial has admitted that, if the system cannot operate at 2.1V, then it will "throttle down" and run at the standard rate. This mirrors what others have been saying elsewhere on the 'Net, but hopefully there's a little more information here.

    - www.macintouch.com 12-15-2005

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    Lightbulb G5 PSU Repair Extension Program

    The Power Mac G5 Repair Extension Program for Power Supply Issues applies to Power Mac G5 systems that have power-related issues as a result of a specific component failure within the computer's power supply. If your Power Mac G5 fails to start up after the power button has been pressed and your computer's serial number is within the noted ranges, your computer may be eligible for repair, free of charge. There are no known safety issues caused by this component failure.

    Identifying Affected Power Mac G5 systems
    The affected Power Mac G5 models were sold between approximately October 2005 and August 2006 and feature Dual 2GHz, Dual 2.3GHz or Quad 2.5GHz PowerPC G5 processors.

    Serial Number Ranges:
    CK539xxxxxx - CK608xxxxxx
    G8539xxxxxx - G8608xxxxxx
    YM539xxxxxx - YM608xxxxxx
    RM539xxxxxx - RM608xxxxxx

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