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Thread: Linux variations

  1. #41
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    I was curious and wanted to find out some links to help point in the right direction. It seems that the best discussion forum is Apple's OS X Server area.

    The forum over on www.xlr8yourmac.com is down and has had trouble but some great people and good info on mysql.

    Glad you found it helpful!

  2. #42
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    I've just acquired an old 7100/66 which I'd like to use for testing web pages on my network. I use Linux for my development work so what do I need (software/cable etc.) to get the Mac connected? The 7100/66 has an AAUI-15 Ethernet card installed but my existing network uses 10/100 Ethernet.

  3. #43
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    If you can a find a AAUI-to-10BaseT transceiver localy, it shouldn't cost you anything, or very little at the least.

    I'd check any sort of continuing education place to see if some department has some stacked in storage collecting dust.

    If you can't find one, try a ebay search. I picked up a couple when I got 2x Apple IIci's (for nostalgia) a couple of summers' ago.

    Unfortuantly I didn't have the foresight to pick up more than just two, otherwise I'd send you one.

    You can also just search for a NuBus e/Net card as well. Either way, as long as you have one or the other and have installed "Ethertalk", you just need to point your browser toward the (I'm assuming) Apache/Linux box.


    ------------------
    Bill

    "I made a conscience decision in a semi-conscious state"

  4. #44
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    OH,

    It also helps if you have a browser of some sort installed on the Mac as well.



    ------------------
    Bill

    "I made a conscience decision in a semi-conscious state"

  5. #45
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    Some sources I've come across say AAUI-15 with transceiver only but another said if there is a NuBus slot available then a NuBus 10baseT card can be installed. There are 3 NuBus slots in this machine, according to the spec, though I don't yet know how many are free. Are NuBus cards cheap/freely available? I'll also have a look for a cheap transceiver. Another question: I can only find 2 memory slots but the spec on EveryMac says it should have 4. Any ideas?

  6. #46
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    Garry,

    A page here http://www.lovemacs.com/products/nics.shtml with both NuBus Ethernet card new/used and AAUI transceiver to 10base-T adapter. Pricey, but it will show you what you are looking for. I preferred the adapter but you already have a NuBus Ethernet card.

    Yes you have four memory SIMM slots http://www.macgurus.com/products/mot.../mbppc7100.php plus 8MB soldered to the motherboard. k

  7. #47
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    quote:
    ven worse, Microsoft's email software is able to infect a user's computer when they do something as innocuous as read an email! Don't believe me? Take a look at Microsoft Security Bulletins MS99-032, MS00-043, MS01-015, MS01-020, MS02-068, or MS03-023, for instance. Notice that's at least one for the last five years. And though Microsoft's latest versions of Outlook block most executable attachments by default, it's still possible to override those protections.

    -----------------

    Unfortunately, running as root (or Administrator) is common in the Windows world. In fact, Microsoft is still engaging in this risky behavior. Windows XP, supposed Microsoft's most secure desktop operating system, automatically makes the first named user of the system an Administrator, with the power to do anything he wants to the computer. The reasons for this decision boggle the mind. With all the lost money and productivity over the last decade caused by countless Microsoft-borne viruses and worms, you'd think the company could have changed its procedures in this area, but no.

    Register 10-7-03


    What's new on CERT -

    http://www.cert.org/nav/whatsnew.html

    The old and now, unfortunately, closed, Security FAQ is HERE

  8. #48
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    I am sure you saw this, but for anyone who has not, M$ will have to defend itself in court regarding security holes.

    __________________

    Charlie Don't Surf!

  9. #49
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    Linux servers become target of more attacks

    According to british security company mi2g, Linux servers increasingly become a target for hacker attacks. The firm found that Linux servers were the most frequently hit, accounting for 13,654 successful attacks, or 80 percent of the survey total. Windows came in a distant second with 2,005 attacks. This study confirms recent warnings of security firms such as Symantec that the growing popularity of the open source operating system will result in a dramatic increase in attacks in 2004.

    Full article: ZDnet News

  10. #50
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    You may retrieve this story by entering QuickLink# 44942
    ComputerWorld

    Security flaw in Linux kernel gets vendor patches
    By TODD R. WEISS
    FEBRUARY 20, 2004

    A security vulnerability in the Linux kernel that could have allowed a hacker to gain control of the operating system on user machines has been patched by the open-source community and Linux vendors.

    In an e-mail today, Starzetz wrote that the bug affects all kernels from the 2.4 series to 2.4.24, all 2.2 kernels to 2.2.25 and the 2.6 kernel series including 2.6.2. The only kernels that are not vulnerable, he said, are 2.4.25 and 2.6.3.

    Patches are being worked on for the 2.2 series kernel, he said. All the odd kernel releases including 2.3 and 2.5 are also vulnerable, but it's unlikely that many people use them because they are development kernels, not release models.

    "The bug is very serious," he wrote, if an attacker gains local access to a vulnerable machine. On a scale of 0 to 10, with 0 being no bug at all, the vulnerability would be scored 10, or "the most serious danger we can imagine," he said. "Due to this seriousness we decided to delay the release of the exploit code until the next week (so that people who care about their machines have enough time to update them)."

    The problem can only be corrected by upgrading a vulnerable machine to the latest kernel version, Starzetz wrote. "These are issues found by goods guys, reported responsibly and dealt with in the right way," Cox said. "It's just kind of a textbook example of how these things should work out." No reports of any attack using the vulnerability have been received, Cox said.

    Patches have already been posted by major vendors, including Red Hat and SUSE Linux AG.

    Last month, iSEC found and reported a similar but unrelated security vulnerability in the Linux kernel memory management code. Patches for that problem were also made available by Red Hat, SUSE and other Linux vendors.

    Linux kernel Security Flaw Patched

    VIRUSES, WORMS AND SECURITY HOLES
    Copyright 2004 Computerworld Inc.

  11. #51
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    A Security Primer for Mac OS X
    by Fran?ois Joseph de Kermadec
    02/20/2004

    The recent security issues that have affected Windows users have led the media--and sometimes even Mac-specialized publications--to talk about the shortcomings of the Windows security scheme and to provide surprisingly detailed advice.

    An in-depth tutorial at O'Reilly's MacDevCenter takes a look at Mac OS X Security and techniques and applications that users can employ to make their Mac more secure.

    In this article, I'll take a hands-on approach to what I call "security through common sense," the basic security steps that every single Mac user should take.

    Published on MacDevCenter (http://www.macdevcenter.com/)
    http://www.macdevcenter.com/pub/a/ma.../security.html

  12. #52
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    Apple-X.net Attacked
    Posted by: Trent on Mar 08, 2004 - 07:07 AM
    SiteNews 508 Reads
    We've been DoSed.

    It appears someone has performed a Denial of Service (DoS) attack on this site.
    http://www.apple-x.net/

    You may have noticed, we even experienced a bit of downtime. We are unsure of the source of the attack, or the reasoning behind it. If anyone knows anything about this, please let us know ASAP.

    The IP behind the attack was: 24.225.153.16

    The attacker used a web spider similar to those used by Google, although this one had apparently been modified to ignore which directories spiders/bots are told to leave alone. It was also set to execute thousands of times, severally screwing up our statistics module as well as our ad tracking system.

  13. #53
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    quote:
    SUSE unveils Linux versions based on 2.6 kernel - Its personal and professional versions will be followed by enterprise versions this summer

    News Story by Todd R. Weiss

    MARCH 18, 2004 (COMPUTERWORLD) - Fresh from its January acquisition by networking software vendor Novell Inc., SUSE Linux AG today unveiled its Personal 9.1 and Professional 9.1 Linux operating systems, which are based on the new Linux 2.6 kernel.

    In an announcement today, Nuremberg, Germany-based SUSE said the two desktop operating systems will be followed by enterprise versions this summer.

    The SUSE Linux 9.1 personal and professional editions include a host of performance benefits from the new 2.6 kernel, including improved threading and memory management and greater ease of use with both 32- and 64-bit processors, according to SUSE.

    Both versions also include the latest Linux desktops -- GNOME 2.4 and KDE 3.2 -- so users can choose their desktop interface.

    Also new in the personal edition is the SUSE Linux 9.1 LiveCD, which requires no installation and allows a user to boot a machine and try out a complete version of the operating system before installing it fully. A second CD with the normal install routine is also included.
    SuSe stopped making a PPC version. I've run x86 linux on VPC 4.x just to check it out. I know there is YDL that is native. Would be interesting to show someone your Mac, have Linux, OS X, Classic, even Windows (just be sure to patch it or you've opened up your windows system to the same worms and security problems. However, this is a perfect way to test various operating systems or versions of the same, in a somewhat safe environment.

  14. #54
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    I think accidentally just trying to boot from YDL 3.01 CD screwed up my Beige beyond ever getting it to boot from OS 9 now or Panther.

    I know now that it messes wtih nvram. I thought that was fixed last fall as far as 10.2.8 and 3.0.

    I tried on B&W and it didn't 'see' Adaptec 29160 properly. I tried on MDD but realized it would require initializing. They now want a ONE MB ("1") hfs partition for a boot loader. You can't even specify something that small on 80GB drive. A 9 or 18GB SCSI drive would be perfect. Small, great performance. But terrible with non-ATA.

    They do support G5 - or so I read on Apple Discussions. I thought Beige, while OldWorld would be easy. And 10.3.3 seems to have messed up Sonnet Tempo's but Sonnet can't confirm ("What to do?" thread). 10.3.3 alone plays havoc. I thought this would be 'safe.' NOT.

    SuSe Linux 6.4 was easy on my B&W. That was years ago and I skipped SuSe 7.x and they have never brought out another PPC build, so YDL seemed "natural." Now I have lots of doubts on that front.

    I subscribed to YDL lists.

    Panther on Beige was easier.

  15. #55
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    It does do things in the NVRAM... but I also think it writes som pretty primary boot OSROM file stuff into the harddrive... I have installed Panther on my Beige a few times and it failed... and I could not get into 9 after... SO I thought to myself "X.3" has written to my PRAM... so thinkin that a good ol' PRAM reset would do the trick I tried the cmd+opt+p+r to no avail... then I did a CUDA which also did nothin'... then I did a logic bd reset which also did nothing... so... I booted from a OS9 CD via the "C" key... then I ran XPF again and rebooted to nuthin' again (actually the /APPL,ROM attenpted to boot to OS9 but it appeared to get hijacked by OSX and it went to the Black Apple On White field with spining icon for EVER)... booted to CD again after a three finger forced restart... from the OS9CD ran disk ut and ZEROED the target drive (I run OS9 on one drive and X on another)...restarted to OS9 on the hdd no issue... SO.. the conclusion is that it does something to the NVRAM and the hdd..."boot" vs. "bye"...

    EDIT: uh... so I think YDL might also do something to the PRAM and hdd... it does do a BootX thing...

  16. #56
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    I've always found that just booting from Jaguar will also "clean up" and update NVRAM and whatever else has happened - a good 'cure all.' Ended up installing 10.2.8 on the drive I was going to use for YDL.

    Looking over their support and problems with a more cynical and experienced eye, I can't see doing it.

    The issue of having to have 1MB partition? BAsically impossible using Disk Utility or even Drive Setup. 32MB was the smallest on 120GB drive. 4MB on another.

    I never even got to boot from a hard drive. I did get to install OS 9.2.1 - meaning I can boot from the CD, but that doesn't do anything and I mistakenly ran XPF from CD. That locks that up and had to force quit. Not good either, it might have corrupted more.

    I don't ususally find zap pram useful, rather, use Open Firmware reset, the "init-nvram" is unique to just the Beige but works.

    I don't trust or think YDL should be trusted with Open Firmware.

    All I did was left YDL 3.01 CD in my system and system tried to boot from it. I also have two computers sitting side by side and forget which one I am connected to and working on at times. ;-(

    Jaguar to the rescue!

  17. #57
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    Network Intrusion Detection (NIDS)

    quote:
    Attacks at universities raise security concerns
    High-performance computer centers targeted

    By Paul Roberts, IDG News Service
    April 14, 2004?

    Malicious hackers in recent weeks have infiltrated computer systems at universities in the U.S. and worldwide, leading to questions about the security of scientific research data, according to an official at the U.S. National Science Foundation.
    ?
    Attacks at universities raise security concerns
    (teachnology)

    The systems were located at universities and research facilities that operate high-performance computer centers, including facilities that are part of a project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and called TeraGrid, said Sangtae Kim, director of the Division of Shared CyberInfrastructure at the NSF, an independent U.S. government agency.

    Supercomputing centers at U.S. universities including the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Center for Advanced Computing Research (CACR) at the California Institute of Technology are partners in the TeraGrid project.

    Systems at TeraGrid partner facilities were hacked, but no systems that make up TeraGrid itself were compromised, Kim said.

    NSF does not know who was behind the attack, but believes it was part of a much larger action that affected high-end systems worldwide, including sites in Europe. Many of the compromised systems are connected to university research centers, he said.

    Stanford University's Information and Technology Systems and Services (ITSS) group published a security alert on Saturday warning researchers about compromises of a number of systems running the Sun Solaris and Linux operating systems on the Stanford campus. The advisory also noted that the attacks were part of a move against "a large number of research institutions and high performance computing centers."

    The university became aware of the intrusions after users noticed discrepancies in the time of their last reported log-in, which indicated that their log-in information had been hijacked. Other systems began performing poorly or reporting errors after the intruders installed so-called "rootkits," or programs that allow the malicious hacker to disguise his or her presence and gather information such as user names and passwords from the compromised system, the ITSS alert said.

    Attackers gained access to the systems by cracking or sniffing passwords from insecure network traffic such as Telnet remote communications sessions or from password files on other compromised systems, according to the alert.

    Once logged on to a system, the attackers looked for systems that were not up to date with their operating system patches, then used known software exploits to elevate their privileges from user to administrator (or "root") status.

    Other systems fell to hackers because of loose security configuration for Network File Service (NFS), a way to share files and directories over networks or the Internet. Many institutions applied loose security to these shared directories to "facilitate the distribution of system management and data processing tasks," the advisory said.

    The ITSS group recommended that compromised systems be taken off the network and completely rebuilt, with new versions of the operating system and up-to-date patches installed.

    Universities that cooperate to conduct scientific research are particularly susceptible to compromise because of the open nature of their mission, according to Jonathan Bingham, president of Intrusic Inc., in Waltham, Massachusetts, which sells technology to spot covert and illicit activity on computer networks, which it terms "noiseless action."

    "You've got large groups of individuals trying to access systems from all over world, so universities commonly have portions of their network set up almost like the Internet, in that access is wide open," he said.

    Malicious hackers can easily gain access to less secure areas of a university's network, then listen to network traffic to capture the credentials needed to access more sensitive areas, he said.

    While some experts raised the specter of massive denial of service (DoS) attacks using the hijacked supercomputers, the real threat to the TeraGrid project and the universities that got hacked is from stealthier behavior, such as quietly leaking sensitive research data or discoveries from compromised research machines, Bingham said.

    While rebuilding and patching compromised systems will close the holes that intruders used, it is no guarantee that the malicious hackers behind the compromise do not still have access to the sensitive networks.

    "Once they're in a network of this size and scope, they're going to compromise other systems using stealth techniques that are different from the ones they used to get in. Once you figured out (the compromise) and know what systems are vulnerable, they're already on a different system," he said.
    Infoworld Security

  18. #58
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    Default Redhat or Debian? Can't use OSX!

    Hi,
    I am venturing into the big wide world with a project that is going to be hosted on a dedicated server. I would have loved to have hosted this on one of my G4s but I don't think that I can get enough bandwidth for what I need to do. This puts me in the hands of a host and unfortunately I cannot use OSX to run it, it has to be Wi**ws (urrgghhh!!!), Debian, Slackware or Redhat.
    I will be using vBulletin to run the guts of the project, but I don't know the first thing about Linux and have never used MySQL before either so this is going to be a huge learning curve.
    But before I get into that I have to make a decision on the OS - any suggestions? The server will be a Linux Series 3.06+ HT RAID
    1024MB RAM
    2 x 120GB Harddisks running
    Hardware Raid-1
    HyperThreading processor
    1000GB data transfer (yearly)
    1 IP address
    24x7x365 FREE reboots
    Redhat / Debian / Slackware

    So any constructive comments would be great, the server cost is around $120 a month based on a 1 year deal.

    Thanking you in eager aniticipation!

  19. #59
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    Default yellow dog 3 on a BW

    I have a g3 bw 300 running 10.3 on a scsi drive that is being hosted off a atto express psc card. I have 2 maxtor drives hosted off my firmtek one as a backup drive the other i plan on installing yellow dog 3 on. Now here my problem.

    I begin the installation and everything is fine. I go navigate through certain screens selecting settings for the install and then i get to a screen which it asks me where i want to install my the OS. it only sees the scsi drive and not the sata drives. How can it see a drive hosted off a scsi pci but not a sata pci....can i install onto the sata drives?

    I was thinking it would be easier to buy an ATA drive and just use that but i want to make sure im not missing something with the sata.

    before you all tell me to go to linux boards, i want you to know i have been to 4 and no one answers me

  20. #60
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    Lightbulb

    Believe it or not, just got around to installing YDL on B&W. It wouldn't install on my Beige and I'm letting it have at my 120GB drive all for itself. Maybe I'll add a 2nd drive for OS X on a host card.

    It doesn't support ACard ATA, or Adaptec SCSI. It seems like they could do a LOT more to support other than native IDE.

    I have an ATTO UL3S except that doesn't have any drives on it (did but I had to "borrow" the SCSI cable). Surprised the PSC works. Maybe they support old stuff only.

    And here they are with YDL 4.0 and G5 64-bit version. Doesn't figure. When I tried on MDD, it would only see ATA.

    So what you are seeing is what I am also, on three systems. Even MDD G4.

    Perhaps somewhere in the newsgroup email digest is how to. Maybe there is an advanced settings tab during install to add a device driver for the FirmTek or something. But it isn't there. Even support for four button mouse is actually absent.

    I'll be interested in Firefox, Thunderbird, file server for home, KDE.

    I hope there are updates, and that it isn't too hard or complex. There is support for Ext2/3 filesystem under OS X now.

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