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Thread: Jazzbo, clarification please...

  1. #1
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    Default Jazzbo, clarification please...

    I moved my Home folder to a non-root volume i.a.w. your most lucid and excellent thread in "FAQs and Help", and you mention the procedure for falling back to the original state with the Home folder on the root volume. I haven't tried to do that because I'm not entirely clear about what I should enter in Terminal to "...reverse step 5 (remove the /Users symlink; rename /Users.old /Users)..." Being more than a little afraid of doing damage when logged into Terminal as Root, would you spell it out for dimwits like me please?

    biggles.
    "illegitimis non carborundum"

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    What is in NetInfo Manager now, is it just /Users/short-username? (no /Volumes/volume-name prefix).

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    TZ,

    no, it's "/Volumes/freedom/Users/shortname". I used Jazzbo's "freedom" name to better follow his instructions, and copied his technique rather than your own because I too would like to have non-root App's in a separate folder on the freedom volume. I'd like to become more fluent and confident in using Terminal, but for now I really do need a bit of hand-holding to get this right because I'm setting up my drives and volumes to work with a new piece of ProTools hardware which just arrived, and I want to do this now, not wait until I'm a Unix geek, which will probably never happen!

    I understand what Jazzbo intends, and I think I know what I should enter in Terminal, but I'm not certain and being logged in as root I'm not doing anything unless I'm certain, being a whimp as well as a dimwit.

    biggles.
    "illegitimis non carborundum"

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    Lightbulb

    If you are using a long path with /Volumes then I would guess that there is no hard symbolic link to the other location.

    What you should be able to do if you want to use the root OS X boot drive for home directory is just change NetInfo Manager to /Users/shortname to have it work.

    I need to do that if I want to run any utility that needs to unmount a volume, so I always keep ~/Library current with mail, preferences, etc. So I never bother to rename users, or delete anything (100MB isn't making a difference).

    I haven't tried using a symlink but the whole idea is that everything would work without specifying /Volumes/volumename is my understanding of why.

    If I could move System Applications to another drive, that would be nice, as they can make OS X sluggish, take a lot of space (iLife, GarageBand, iDVD etc) and would be nice to have elsewhere. Good use for a fast 18GB drive.

    I have managed to muck up things more than once as root. So I don't even do so anymore - ever! But if I do, it is on one of my 'spare' disk drives that is just for testing purposes, and never one of my 'live' or real systems or its backups even.

    If there is something left to learn, that can go wrong, I know I'll find it and get forced to dig through my own self-induced school of hard knocks - knowing what to do is half of it, knowing what not to do is the more important half sometimes.

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    muy gracias amigo,

    since this is my first go-round moving the Home folder, I am using a volume on a non-root drive, and yes we learn from our mistakes, but I'm a real scaredy-cat when it comes to Root and Terminal in the same breath. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing; having very little knowledge I'm very dangerous.

    biggles.
    "illegitimis non carborundum"

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    It was a case of the concepts standing for the commands in my mind.

    I've edited the procedure, made the final clean-up its own step (6), and broken the fall-back steps off at the end with the necessary commands in place.

    Thank-you for bringing that one to the fore!

    Of course, you shouldn't actually be needing the fall-back procedure unless something went horribly wrong. Nothing did, did it?

    Jazzbo

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    Thanks Jazzbo, now I'm certain! More questions, doubtless, in the future. And no, nothing went wrong at all, I just wanted to undo my handiwork and do it over a time or two to get it straight in my head.

    P.S. Just read your amendment again, and you say "can't fallback" when I think you mean "can".
    "illegitimis non carborundum"

  8. #8
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    I've tweaked it a little bit. You can't fall back after removing /Users.old from the root disk. I needed to reinforce that (a) /Users.old gets more and more archaic the longer you run with home directories elsewhere and (b) you can't fall back to /Users.old once you've removed it.

    Jazzbo

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    Default re. fallback

    Jazzbo,

    I figured that's what you meant!

    Talking of fallbacks, once confident enough to remove /Users.old, I'd want to backup /Users on the non-root volume on a scheduled basis using SyncroniseProX.

    Should I want to revert to said backup can it be done by simply changing the volume name in NetInfoManager from "freedom" to the name of the volume where the backup resides?

    Thanks again for your clarity.

    biggles.
    "illegitimis non carborundum"

  10. #10
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    Yes! That and flip the target of the symlink of the root disk's /Users:
    #
    # Remove now-obsolete /Users symbolic link
    #
    rm /Users

    #
    # Set new symlink
    #
    ln -s /Volumes/NewDisk/Users /
    Jazzbo

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    Brilliant! Thanks. Now with a little more knowledge I can go off and be a little more, or should that be less, dangerous!

    Cheers.
    "illegitimis non carborundum"

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    Default Yes, scared too

    Quote Originally Posted by biggles
    since this is my first go-round moving the Home folder, I am using a volume on a non-root drive, and yes we learn from our mistakes, but I'm a real scaredy-cat when it comes to Root and Terminal in the same breath. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing; having very little knowledge I'm very dangerous.
    I know the feeling and am getting ready to move my /users or /home (same thing right?)

    I have read a lot of threads using different methods - and have one question... there seems to be 3 ways to do this - is one better/easier/safer or less problematic than another.

    * Follow Jazzbo's instructions here http://www.macgurus.com/forums/showthread.php?t=18789
    * Mike Bombich's instructions here http://www.bombich.com/mactips/homedir.html seems really short?
    * Use NetInfo Manager

    Any suggestions or advice appreciated. BACKUP BACKUP

    Thanks
    Randy

  13. #13
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    Default

    Randy, I've had absolutely flawless results using Jazzbo's method.
    Bombichs' I could never get to work-
    Netinfo is part of Jazzbo's and another big key to success seems to be the ditto while root, and not just admin.
    my 2 cts.

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    another big key to success seems to be the ditto while root, and not just admin.
    Please elaborate on this. - Thanks, Randy

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    Randy,

    Jazzbo means -- I'm almost 100% sure -- that you want to log in as 'root' (the root user) and run that 'ditto' command. That is preferable to logging in with an ordinary administrator account and running the 'ditto' command (even with 'sudo' in front of it to gain temporary root-type privileges).

    To log in as root, you need to make sure that you've first activated the root account. Thereafter you log in as the root user, launch Terminal, and execute the 'ditto' command Jazzbo posted. Info on activating and logging as root can be found in Apple kbase 106290.

    The reason if I recall from Jazzbo is this. The root user has its own home directory, much like you have your home directory. Moreover, root's home directory isn't stored in /Users -- it resides elsewhere. So this helps insure a clean(er) ditto (or copying) of the /Users directory or individual home directories, precisely because none of the home directories in /Users (or items inside of them) are in use. If you ditto copy your home directoyr, while logged in with your normal admin account, then some of the items in your home directory are in use -- that may cause problems. Jazzbo noted so problems with doing this as an ordinary admin user probably because items within that admin's home directory were in use.

    So to avoid that problem, Jazzbo suggests logging in as root and executing the 'ditto' command.

  16. #16
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    Check out The Mac OS X Command Line
    - Unix Under the Hood


    It even sounds like it could have been written by Jazzbo, hands down.

    I've seen less trouble since 10.3.3 with volumes not mounting, but I was still backing up my ~/Library BACK to the boot volume "just in case" so I had current preferences, mail, bookmkarks (though they are also burned to CD monthly or more).

    Panther is forgiving. Previously you really could not use the Finder to drag+copy a home directory and have it work and not have trouble. Now, anyone can do it, and have it work.

    NetInfo Manager could be as easy to use as Batchmod, and drag a folder into it or on it, and not have to type a path, in order to avoid any typo.

    the hardest part is probably nuking the olde User directory.
    or forgetting to make sure that "Ignore Ownership" is left on and programs refuse to run.

  17. #17
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    Eric has that right. We still have problems copying certain programs or doing auto backups while an app is running. Mail is a good example. When you launch Mail App it actually put a lock file of the mailbox files. If you make a ditto of the User files with mail app running it copies that locked state. Then when you try and run off of it it won't let you open the mailboxes since they are now locked. The cure is to always make major copies while not logged in as yourself.

    Rick
    molṑn labe'
    "I am a mortal enemy to arbitrary government and unlimited power. I am naturally very jealous for the rights and liberties of my country, and the least encroachment of those invaluable privileges is apt to make my blood boil."
--Ben Franklin

  18. #18
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    Thanks guys

    It seems straight forward but... I've had so many other issues going on and just have not had the time to work much with my computer. I am getting more of "my time" back and figured I would toss out that last question - as I read threads/posts it seems people are doing this fairly easy.

    I've been wanting to "do this - mostly to learn" and to hopefully get rid of my goofy color image issues.

    It would be nice to have it just go flawless.

    By the weekends end.....

    Randy

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