Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: Best Boot Drive

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb Best Boot Drive

    I'm still waiting for a review of the new Hitachi 15K73 that promises to bring 79.99MB/sec (80MB maybe for first?) so I thought I'd go back and look at where 15K drives are at right now.

    One thing worth noting: if you have a 15K Cheetah, the latest firmware is 0006, but it may not be the best revision. If you have a PC, you can use Seagate's SeaTools utility for Enterprise to upgrade (downgrade?) the firmware - something we weren't aware was an option. And why is 0005 the best? We don't have an answer ;-(

    When Maxtor brought out its 15K, only Seagate had anything to offer (getting lonely at the top?) and Fujitsu hadn't brought out their 15K model.

    so I went back to read reviews of 15K drives:
    SR: Atlas 15K and comparing 15K drives

    TechReport
    Conclusion:
    If $639 is a little hard to swallow, keep in mind that the Atlas 15K also comes in 18GB and 36GB flavors that retail for as little as $229 and $366, respectively. Drives with fewer platters should be a little faster, too, making them perfect for high-load environments where storage capacity isn't as important.

    Technically, I suppose Western Digital's Raptor Serial ATA drive and our IDE RAID configuration are also appropriate solutions for enterprise environments. However, as our IOMeter results demonstrate all too clearly, these drive configurations don't have what it takes to run with high-end SCSI gear as I/O loads ramp up. Even 10K-RPM SCSI doesn't come close to catching the Atlas 15K in IOMeter, a testament to the importance of spindle speed in these applications.

    As fantastic a performer as the Atlas 15K is in loaded workstation and server environments, the drive is really overkill for even hard-core enthusiasts' desktops, where load levels won't begin to exploit the drive's real potential. Even 10K-RPM SCSI drives aren't particularly appropriate for desktops. However, I don't have to think twice about recommending the Atlas 15K for servers, workstations, or other environments where the drive will be inundated with concurrent I/O requests. Atlas 15K Review
    Tom's Hardware: Atlas 15K vs. Raptor 10K
    "RAIDCore Unleashes SATA to (try) Take Out SCSI"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb Maxtor Atlas 15K II and 10K V

    #1: Atlas 15K II (and 15K.4) are ~95-98MB/sec.
    Maxtor Atlas 10K IV
    Maxtor Atlas 15K
    Maxtor Atlas 15K II
    Head-to-Head Comparison
    _________________________
    Qualification of next gen Atlas drives from Maxtor offer a lot of features.

    the 10k V evolves the series' four-platter design to reach capacities of up to 300 GB and up from 70MB/sec to 89MB/sec, while the 15k II sports formidable specs such as a 3.0 ms seek time and transfer rate approaching 100 MB/sec.

    The Atlas 10K V drive features capacities of 73, 147 and 300GB, and a 10,000 RPM rotational speed. The drive offers a maximum sustained transfer rate of 89MB/sec and average seek times as fast as 4.0ms, a 24 percent sequential performance improvement and 7 percent average seek time improvement over the previous generation of Atlas 10K drives.

    The Atlas 15K II drive features capacities of 36, 73 and 147GB, and a 15,000 RPM rotational speed. The drive offers a maximum sustained transfer rate of 98MB/sec and average seek times as fast as 3.0ms, a 31 percent sequential performance improvement and 7 percent seek time improvement over the previous generation Atlas 15K drives. Both the Atlas 10K V drive and Atlas 15K II drive include an 8MB cache buffer.

    The MaxAdapt features enable the Atlas 10K V and Atlas 15K II drives to adjust to a myriad of system designs and conditions for ease of integration. MaxAdapt features include Maxtor's third-generation Adaptive Active Filtration and three new features: Adaptive Bias Estimation, Rotational Vibration Compensation and Virtual Cache Lines. This unique feature set monitors and adjusts to varying system conditions such as temperature, workloads, rotational vibration and electrical noise to optimize the system's sequential and random performance.
    Press Release
    Yes, actually I did download the "Atlas 15K II Product Manual" prior and had the relevant pages open and in view as I set the drive ids. The J3 block on the Atlas 15K II appears similar to the X15.3 Cheetah's J6 but is recessed under the drive:



    The diagram was confusing in terms of pin-pair identification because of the "SCSI ID (3)" label. In the "Atlas 15K II Installation Guide" I thought they were describing this label and the others- "SCSI ID (2)", "SCSI ID (1), and "SCSI ID (0)":



    This led me to erroneously conclude the labels "Pin 1" and "Pin 2" were actually pin 8 and pin 7....

    As for Configuration Tool, I've used this twice now- "hot-plugging" the two external cables into the UL4D, and then "re-scanning for devices". It worked apparently just fine; within 15 seconds or so, the single striped volume re-mounted in the Finder with no obvious problem.



    I couldn't find anything in particular on the ATTO site about this; I suspect there is something low-level installed on my startup causing a problem... But the strange thing about the all LEDs on the terms lighting up and staying brightly lit is that it occurs instantly upon the startup chime from a cold boot- not even a few seconds into the boot process, but immediately.
    Last edited by TZ; 09-21-2005 at 06:47 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb Defragmentation to test disk performance?

    "Defragmentation"

    In this article we’ll discuss if defragmentation can be used as a performance test for hard disk drives. We will also see how the time it takes to perform a defragmentation procedure depends on the Native Command Queuing technology support. 16 hard disk drives participated in our test session.

    Areal density and firmware algorithms are the factors that determine the time it takes to defragment a hard disk. The amount of cache memory and the spindle rotation speed influence the speed of the process, too, but in a lesser degree since most products available today have the same amount of cache (16MB) and the same spindle speed (7200rpm).

    The number of platters, to our surprise, has almost no effect on the defragmentation process.

    The winners of our today’s test are the 500GB Samsung HD501LJ and Seagate ST3500630AS and the representatives of the more serious and speedy category, Western Digital’s WD740ADFD and WD1500ADFD.

    We hope Seagate will make its other drives as fast as the leader among them while Western Digital should take note that its drives are among outsiders when it comes to defragmentation.

    To our surprise, the defragmentation process took longer with enabled NCQ, even though not by much. We are going to return to this problem later on, but we’d want to ask for your opinion – which defragmenter should we use next?

    If you try to keep your home computer quiet, take a look at Hitachi’s HDDs. You can reduce their noise greatly by sacrificing some 5% of performance.

    Defragmentation to test disk performance?
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/sto...mentation.html
    Last edited by TZ; 06-22-2007 at 05:46 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Default Future Seagate 10K and 15K

    Cheetah 10K.7- The seventh-generation Cheetah will go head-to-head with offerings such as the Maxtor Atlas 10K V and Fujitsu MAU by offering densities of up to 75 GB/platter and up to 300 gigabytes of capacity. Note, however, that the manufacturer regards this latest Cheetah as its final 10K RPM, 3.5” chassis offering. Up to 80MB/sec.

    The future and the transition to Serial-Attached SCSI will be left to the…

    Savvio 10K.1- The Savvio, already announced a few months ago, will be rechristened the Savvio 10K.1. It will shrink the traditional 10K RPM mechanism and will cram it into a smaller chassis to reduce generated heat, noise, and necessary cooling. Performance will also increase through smaller stroke distances. Meanwhile, creeping ever more into the mainstream is the… up to 63MB/sec.

    Cheetah 15K.4- While offerings from competitors such as Maxtor and Seagate have delivered category-leading performance, the 15K RPM Cheetah series remains the sector’s standard-bearer. The 15K.4 will combine up to four 36-gigabyte platters to yield a 147 GB flagship. With up to 96MB/sec.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb Raptor 10K vs Atlas 15K II

    Storage Review Drive Performance Database Comparison
    Atlas 15K II vs Raptor 10K

    Puget Systems SCSI vs SATA, Which is Faster?
    Last edited by TZ; 09-13-2005 at 07:48 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Virginia... where one Democrat CAN make a difference
    Posts
    2,929

    Default

    Although the Raptor performed well for SATA it seems the Atlas didn't even break a sweat in order to win
    Damien,

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    2,352

    Post

    Hello TZ,

    just installed an JMR Fortra 15x147GB 10k's. Got an 15k MAU3147NP from the reseller for testing and man..... it is fast connected to the UL4 in OS 9 (with ATTO tools) it was in the mid 90's read and write. Need to do some serious testing at home under X maybe I tested only the cache of the drive.

    At a retail price of 1249Euros/$1600 I would not buy it.

    Regards

    Nicolas

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb Leaderboard listings

    Storage Review Leaderboard

    Atlas 15K II vs Fujitsu Series

    Atlas 15K II
    MAU3147 15K
    MAS3735 10K
    MAT3300 10K - Review "Coming Soon" (let's hope so! they also need to review the Hitachi 10K300 series also).

    300GB drives all have 4 platters, 8 heads. Hitachi uses an extra platter on the 73GB (2 instead of one, and 3 heads instead of 2).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb Barefeats: Ultimate G5 boot drive

    Barefeats: Boot drive speedlooks at notebook and G5 drive performance.

    ANOTHER QUESTION: What about on the G5 Power Mac? Will drives with different interfaces, rotations speeds, and/or access times make a difference?

    The answer is, "YES." (See graph below)



    The SATA boot drive launched apps 6% faster than the FireWire 800 boot drive, even though the FireWire 800 boot drive was actually a dual drive hardware RAID set. The Ultra320 SCSI boot drive was 12.7% faster than the FireWire 800 boot set, but was only 6.4% faster than the SATA boot drive. Since the Ultra SCSI drive costs quite a bit more and stores quite a bit less than SATA or PATA drives, I don't think the investment is justified.

    Our Power Mac testing was cut short because the G5 started crashing on startup. It continued until I removed the Ultra SCSI controller. Once we troubleshoot that nasty problem, we'll try to add more graphs to this section.
    SOURCES OF TEST PRODUCTS
    The Aluminum G4/1.5GHz PowerBook was purchased by the Bare Feats lab from the local Apple Retail Store. It came with the "stock" 4200rpm 80GB drive.


    The 5400rpm test drive was a Fujitsu MHT2060AH (60GB) provided courtesy of Fujitsu PR.
    The 7200rpm notebook drive was a Hitachi 7K60 (60GB) model provided courtesy of TransIntl.com.
    For the G5 Boot drive tests, we used our G5/2.0GHz MP Power Mac purchased from Small Dog Electronics.
    The FireWire 800 boot drive was a LaCie Big Disk Extreme (Dual Maxtor MaxLine Pro II 250GB 7200rpm drives in a striped array).
    The SATA boot drive was a Hitachi 7K400 (400GB, 7200rpm).
    The Ultra320 SCSI drive was a Seagate Cheetah 15K.3 (73GB 15,000rpm) connected to an ATTO UL4D dual channel Ultra320 SCSI controller.


    Update: Ultimate G5 Boot Drive - but doesn't look at the latest 15K or 10K SCSI drives. See Ultra320 Drives for 1st generation 15K drive comparison (doesn't include current generation drives).
    [url=http://www.barefeats.com/hard28.html] - not much improvement of dual vs single 15K drive.
    Last edited by TZ; 11-25-2005 at 01:06 PM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb

    I think it helps when thinking about disk drives to look at 'best of class' and where/how it will be used. A good review, benchmark, would cover more than just one or two variables. Check out Storage Review Leaderboard (last updated Aug 12, 2004).

    From Storage Review comparing 15K Atlas, 10K Raptor, 10K-IV Atlas, and Hitachi 7K250 representing 10 and 15K SCSI, SATA in 10K and 7.2K models for server, booting, gaming, office apps, server, heat, noise, I/Os per second and more.

    Read the review of the Hitachi 7K250. Techreport 7K250

    Raptor 10K for their review on this drive and Drive Comparison DB

    When it comes to performance, the Raptor with latest firmware, is edging out the Seagate Cheetah (X15.3) in the 73GB form. Performance Database Check out the side by side 15K/10K Atlas vs Cheetah X15 vs Raptor

    quote:
    Despite the lack of a key feature, tagged command queuing, the engineering sample hinted at performance not previously heard of outside the latest crop of 15,000 RPM monsters.

    The WD740GD hit general availability in mid-December. Though it took much longer than hoped, the firm has finally supplied SR with production samples. This newest Raptor features a 10,000 RPM spindle speed, two 37 GB platters, a 4.5 millisecond advertised seek time, an 8-megabyte buffer, and a 5-year warranty.

    Though the product itself features firmware-level tagged command queuing, at the time of this writing, no appropriate controllers were available from several likely manufacturers. TCQ will likely bring significantly better performance scaling as multi-user loads increase; as of now, however, it remains a future promise. This initial review features the Raptor operating with a Promise SATA150TX4 controller.

    The Western Digital Raptor WD740GD is compared against the following drives for the following reasons:

    Maxtor Atlas 10k IV - Current-generation 10k RPM SCSI drive
    Fujitsu MAP3147 - Current-generation 10k RPM SCSI drive
    Seagate Cheetah 10K.6 -Current-generation 10k RPM SCSI drive
    IBM Ultrastar 146Z10 - Current-generation 10k RPM SCSI drive
    Maxtor Atlas 15k - Reigning champion for single-user performance
    Hitachi Deskstar 7K250 - fastest 7200 RPM SATA drive currently
    (the Deskstar 7K400 changed that)

    Western Digital Caviar WD2500JD Western Digital's SATA drive

    ------------

    CONCLUSIONS

    Despite its announcement several years ago and the surrounding hoopla that ensued, the serial ATA interface remains in relative infancy, especially when contrasted to the tried and true SCSI bus. Though it was formally publicized over four months ago, the Caviar WD740GD still lacks accompanying controllers that would presumably elevate it to competitive status in server applications through the enabling of tagged command queuing. Thus, those seeking a drive for a server that routinely exceeds light to medium loads should remain focused on more mature, proven SCSI solutions.

    Ironically, despite the inclusion of command queuing and the associated promise of better multi-user performance, the WD740GD follows in the footsteps of its predecessor. The WD360GD won over many fans in the enthusiast/gaming community thanks to its outstanding single-user performance.

    Western Digital's newest entry shatters previous records by even more astonishing margins. In addition to leaving all other 10k RPM SCSI drives in the dust, the WD740GD approaches the performance of the 15k RPM Fujitsu MAS3735 and Maxtor Atlas 15k in the Office and Gaming DriveMarks.

    Further, it handily bests the two powerhouses in the High-End and Bootup DriveMarks. Overall, for non-server use, Western Digital's Raptor WD740GD is the fastest single hard disk one can buy regardless of spindle speed, interface, or price. The fact that it is so quiet, runs much cooler, and remains significantly less expensive than its SCSI counterparts is simply icing on the cake. Make no mistake about it- the Raptor WD740GD is the drive for power users, period.

    Review WD 10K Raptor 73GB (2004)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb

    I think it helps when thinking about disk drives to look at 'best of class' and where/how it will be used. A good review, benchmark, would cover more than just one or two variables. Check out Storage Review Leaderboard (last updated Aug 12, 2004).

    From Storage Review comparing 15K Atlas, 10K Raptor, 10K-IV Atlas, and Hitachi 7K250 representing 10 and 15K SCSI, SATA in 10K and 7.2K models for server, booting, gaming, office apps, server, heat, noise, I/Os per second and more.

    Read the review of the Hitachi 7K250. Techreport 7K250

    Raptor 10K for their review on this drive and Drive Comparison DB

    When it comes to performance, the Raptor with latest firmware, is edging out the Seagate Cheetah (X15.3) in the 73GB form. Performance Database Check out the side by side 15K/10K Atlas vs Cheetah X15 vs Raptor

    quote:
    Despite the lack of a key feature, tagged command queuing, the engineering sample hinted at performance not previously heard of outside the latest crop of 15,000 RPM monsters.

    The WD740GD hit general availability in mid-December. Though it took much longer than hoped, the firm has finally supplied SR with production samples. This newest Raptor features a 10,000 RPM spindle speed, two 37 GB platters, a 4.5 millisecond advertised seek time, an 8-megabyte buffer, and a 5-year warranty.

    Though the product itself features firmware-level tagged command queuing, at the time of this writing, no appropriate controllers were available from several likely manufacturers. TCQ will likely bring significantly better performance scaling as multi-user loads increase; as of now, however, it remains a future promise. This initial review features the Raptor operating with a Promise SATA150TX4 controller.

    The Western Digital Raptor WD740GD is compared against the following drives for the following reasons:

    Maxtor Atlas 10k IV - Current-generation 10k RPM SCSI drive
    Fujitsu MAP3147 - Current-generation 10k RPM SCSI drive
    Seagate Cheetah 10K.6 -Current-generation 10k RPM SCSI drive
    IBM Ultrastar 146Z10 - Current-generation 10k RPM SCSI drive
    Maxtor Atlas 15k - Reigning champion for single-user performance
    Hitachi Deskstar 7K250 - fastest 7200 RPM SATA drive currently
    (the Deskstar 7K400 changed that)

    Western Digital Caviar WD2500JD Western Digital's SATA drive

    ------------

    CONCLUSIONS

    Despite its announcement several years ago and the surrounding hoopla that ensued, the serial ATA interface remains in relative infancy, especially when contrasted to the tried and true SCSI bus. Though it was formally publicized over four months ago, the Caviar WD740GD still lacks accompanying controllers that would presumably elevate it to competitive status in server applications through the enabling of tagged command queuing. Thus, those seeking a drive for a server that routinely exceeds light to medium loads should remain focused on more mature, proven SCSI solutions.

    Ironically, despite the inclusion of command queuing and the associated promise of better multi-user performance, the WD740GD follows in the footsteps of its predecessor. The WD360GD won over many fans in the enthusiast/gaming community thanks to its outstanding single-user performance.

    Western Digital's newest entry shatters previous records by even more astonishing margins. In addition to leaving all other 10k RPM SCSI drives in the dust, the WD740GD approaches the performance of the 15k RPM Fujitsu MAS3735 and Maxtor Atlas 15k in the Office and Gaming DriveMarks.

    Further, it handily bests the two powerhouses in the High-End and Bootup DriveMarks. Overall, for non-server use, Western Digital's Raptor WD740GD is the fastest single hard disk one can buy regardless of spindle speed, interface, or price. The fact that it is so quiet, runs much cooler, and remains significantly less expensive than its SCSI counterparts is simply icing on the cake. Make no mistake about it- the Raptor WD740GD is the drive for power users, period.

    Review WD 10K Raptor 73GB (2004)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb SR Drive Comparison DB

    The newest testbed results are available to compare drives for various performance characteristics.
    http://www.storagereview.com/comparison.html

    Storage Review LeaderBoard now using the new Testbed4.
    Last edited by TZ; 11-05-2005 at 07:20 AM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb Best choices in a drive

    New shuffle and changes at the top of leading hard drives:
    http://www.storagereview.com/articles/leaderboard.html

    With ...

    Desktop / Single-User Hitachi Deskstar 7K500
    The Deskstar 7K500 continues Hitachi's tradition of offering the largest and fastest drives around. This 500-gigabyte behemoth easily outpaces all its 7200 RPM competition and even puts serious pressure on WD's 10K RPM Raptor.

    Past Leaders: Maxtor MaXLine III (4Q 2004); Hitachi Deskstar 7K400 (3Q 2004); Hitachi Deskstar 7K250 (4Q 2003)

    Light-Duty Server / Nearline - Western Digital Caviar RE2
    Western Digital's 400-gigabyte SATA drive rolls a design leveraged from the Raptor series, best-of-class multi-user performance, and a 24/7 100% duty cycle into an all-around attractive package. Those willing to sacrifice capacity for IOPs should continue to look to the Raptor WD740GD.

    High-Capacity Server - Fujitsu MAT3300NP
    Under heavier loads, Fujitsu's 300-gigabyte MAT3300 delivers the most IOPs. In moderate queue depths, however, Maxtor's Atlas 10K V offers slightly better performance. Seagate's unique Savvio 10K.1 also performs quite well and sports a smaller form factor that dissipates far less power.

    Past Leaders: Maxtor Atlas 10k V (1Q 2005); Maxtor Atlas 10k IV (1Q 2003); Fujtisu MAP3147 (4Q 2002); Seagate Cheetah 10K.6 (3Q 2002)

    High-Performance Server - Maxtor Atlas 15K II
    When it comes to the fastest of the fast, Maxtor's 147 GB Atlas 15K II remains untouchable.
    The drive offers significant performance benefits over the competition under light to moderate loads and maintains a tenacious lead under the heaviest of queue depths.

    Past leader: Fujitsu MAS3735 (2Q 2003); Maxtor Atlas 15k (2Q 2003); Seagate Cheetah 15k.3 (3Q 2002); Seagate Cheetah X15-36LP (2Q 2001)
    Hitachi 7K500 vs four top 15K drives
    Last edited by TZ; 11-05-2005 at 07:18 AM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb About Seek times...


  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb Ultimate SATA Drive: WD's 150GB Raptor

    Ultimate Quad G5 Boot Drive
    http://www.barefeats.com/hard63.html
    Next Generation SATA (and SATA-II) Hard Drive Comparison

    It's pretty well established now, that if you are in the market for a new hard drive for a modern system, it should be SATA. And as newer chipsets are released with support for advanced features like NCQ and SATA-II, choosing a drive is requiring a bit more research.

    Today we'll be putting the latest drives from the 4 HD manufacturers to the test. We have WD's venerable Raptor, in 74GB form, Seagate's latest flagship, the Barracuda 7200.8, Maxtor's DiamondMax10. And representing the first SATA-II drive to hit our labs is the T7K250 from Hitachi.

    Curious to see how these drives perform? Check out the review.
    http://www.hardcoreware.net/reviews/review-277-1.htm

    Compare the fastest drives available

    Update: Comparing DM10 300GB vs 10K Raptor 150GB

    Now includes comparison of latest 500GB drives along with 150GB Raptor and Maxtor.
    http://www.barefeats.com/hard68.html
    Last edited by TZ; 03-09-2006 at 11:02 AM.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb SATA 500GB Drives

    WD, Maxtor, Hitachi and Seagate models

    SR Performance Comparison

    First up will be a roundup-style look at a trio of 500 GB enterprise offerings from the big three American drive manufacturers: Seagate's NL35.2, Maxtor's MaXLine Pro, and Western Digital's Caviar RE2 WD5000.

    Tests are with NCQ both enabled and disabled.
    WD Caviar RE2 looks like the one to beat.

    Silent PC Review WD5000KS

    Surprisingly, this 500GB monster beats even their most quiet reference drives (1-platter drives)! Their conclusion: "The 500 GB Caviar SE16 is the quietest 3.5" desktop drive that we know of on the market today". Also, its power consumption is low, surprisingly low just in active seeking...Silent PC Review tested WD5000KS

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Virginia... where one Democrat CAN make a difference
    Posts
    2,929

    Default

    WD (back in the day) was the red headed step child of the hard drive world. They were never fast and they sounded like they would fly apart at a moments notice. You always found them in the cheapest PC's. They were heartily mediocre.

    Now look at them. Raptors and now what seems to be the Big bad SATA to beat. whoda thunk it?
    Damien,

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Lightbulb 3.0Gbps DOES Matter!

    Barefeats found that with the right 3 Gbps controller, jumpering a drive to run in 300MB/sec mode really does make a noticeable difference, especially on small (cache size) files.

    My contention is that you will want to squeeze all you can from your boot drive. As I understand it, Mac OS X and Mac OS X apps spend much of the time doing small random and sequential reads and writes.

    Therefore, if you can find a 3G SATA host adapter that will boot OS X and you have a true 3G rated boot drive, you should see a boost in speed over the factory SATA controller during typical operation of your Power Mac. Ideally, the 3G host adapter should have internal ports, allowing you to easily bypass the factory data cables.

    DOES THIS MYTHICAL ADAPTER EXIST?
    Currently, the only 3G SATA adapter that can boot OS X is the PCIe card from FirmTek (SeriTek/2SE2-E). However, it has external ports. I suppose you could boot from an external box or route the cables back inside your dual-core or quad-core Power Mac.

    I'm enouraging Sonnet Technology (and other companies) to support booting on both their PCIe and PCI-X 3G SATA host adapters.
    http://www.barefeats.com/hard79.html

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •