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Thread: equalizers...

  1. #1
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    ok so i've got itunes 2. yay for equalizers. but! i've got apple's pro audio speakers (the little clear round ones!). these speakers dont seem to work too well with the equalizer presets that came with itunes 2. (ie they're terrible with the bass, just fine with the trebble.) has anyone who's got these same speakers made any equalizer settings specifically for them? i think i've found a good setting for the rock genre, but they sometimes dont sound that great. like right now, haha. what a coincidence.
    anyway, if anyone knows where to find some equalizer settings for the pro audio speakers, please tell!

    [This message has been edited by capacity (edited 10 December 2001).]

  2. #2
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    Those speakers aren't capable of producing any low frequencies, so the EQ ain't gonna help much, if at all.

    The best solution if space is an issue would be to put a subwoofer under your desk. That way, it doesn't matter what it looks like!

    If space is not an issue, get some bigger speakers. Something with at least an 8" woofer. Check the music gear sites for some cool powered monitors.

    ------------------
    I started out with nothing.
    I still have most of it left!

  3. #3

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    ive got tannoy studio monitors, running thru a samson amp, running thru a behriger mixer, and i still think itunes equalizer suckz..i was really lookin forward to it too... i realize its just a soundjam remake, but still....ahh..maybe it's just me..god(ish) bless outboard equalizerz..

    jeremy...

  4. #4
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    You have to realize that the iTunes EQ is designed for a specific purpose. The EQ was added to allow people to boost bass, to lower treble, and to think that they have control over how their music sounds. The EQ is that and only that.

    If you want to hear your CDs/mp3s/streaming music produced well get a decent set of speakers. Capacity - you should get an external sub if you want to increase the bass of your speaker, no 3" speaker can produce sound below about 80 Hz.

    I listen to music and mix on a pair of Mackie HR824s. These things rock. They have no audio signature, and sound great at all loudness levels.

  5. #5
    tachyon Guest

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    "to think that they have control over how their music sounds."

    HAH!

    How many times have you gone over to someone's house and their dinky 5-band-home-stereo EQ is set up in a lowercase "n" shape boosting all the low mids and treble & bass are being cut? Or they turn it up at a party *and* boost the bass so it's distorting all over the place?

    Presets that can be attached to particular mp3 files or Audio CD signatures, now that's the way to go for these people!

  6. #6
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    To "control" how something sounds you have to be able to change the waveform very specifically and exactly. The dinky 10 band EQ in iTunes is no different from a just treble and bass knobs. The user cannot exert "control" on the sound. Yes they can drastically sweep a few octaves up and down my 12 dB, but that is not "control", it is more along the lines of rampant disregard for the sound of the music and the intentions of the artist.

    I think that speakers should reproduce music as accurately as possible. Thus, when I listen to music I want to hear what the artist/s heard and what they wanted. Boosting bass by 15 dB so that you can make your toaster dance is fun , but at that point you are not listening to the CD, you are listening to your strange version of it.

    If you know that your speakers have a week spot (like the inability of small speakers to put out low frequencies) than by all means change your setup to compensate. But, a ten band EQ is not going to help. You should probably change your physical setup (like adding a sub). Add to even out the bumps in the curve you could use a parametric EQ if you wanted.

    Ok - end of obsession over quality of sound - moving on ...

    I agree that having the ability to specify EQ curves to specific files would be great. Some recordings need help to sound good (like bad hiss from an old vinyl). But a ten band EQ is not going to help you get rid of a sound as narrow (in terms of Hz) as a hiss, for that a fully parametric EQ is needed. I doubt that we will see a parametric EQ on any music player (iTunes, Audition, etc). Most users would have no clue what to do with it.

    Ok - now obsession over quality of sound is over - moving on ...


    - Chris

    [This message has been edited by chatwood2 (edited 29 November 2001).]

  7. #7
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    Dec 2000
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    i used to borrow a rta unit from a place i used to work for, bring it home, play some pink noise and flatten the curves.

  8. #8
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    RTAs are really, especially hardware ones. They give really accurate readings because the mic signature is known, and thus can be compensated for.

    There are some nice software packages out there like Smaart Pro (though PC only). Software packages are neat in that you can record curves to reference later, and the measurement/averaging type is easy to change, but they are only as good as what feeds them. If a bad mic is used your readings will be way off.

    The other thing to keep in mind with RTA and equalization is that your ears can be valuable tools. Just because a measurement tool says one thing does not make it correct, trust your ears.

    Really at all levels of audio that is the best advice - make sure it sounds good to you. If you can't hear the difference between an mp3 at 128 kbps and an mp3 at 320 kbps, by all means go for the 128 and save the hard drive space.

    - Chris

  9. #9
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    Is a RTA the same as a spectrum analyzer? I acquired an Audio Control 31-band spectrum analyzer + calibrated mic last summer, but it's been only a light show so far. Since July I've put my serious finding into PowerMac 9500 upgrades instead of my stereo (insert Tim Allen grunting here--uh uh uh!).

    I'm coming to realize I maybe shouda sprung for the matching stereo equalizers, because the 31-band EQ at the pro audio shops each seem to have 31 bands centered at slightly different frequencies than each other. Someday I'll write them down from the Spectrum Analyzer and make a concerted search.

    ------------------
    ricercar

    my free 9500 is nickel-and-diming me to death!

  10. #10
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    RTA's (real time analyzers) and spectrum analyzers are pretty much the same. One difference that might exist deals with comparing waveforms. RTAs are designed to compare two inputs (a mic in front of a speaker and the signal driving that speaker). This allows you to see how the speaker and room change the sound. RTAs often have a 'difference' function that graphs the difference between the two inputs, making adjusting an EQ or room treatments easier. I am not sure that a pure 'spectrum analyzer' can do this, they might be for a single source.

    - Chris

  11. #11
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    Thanks for the tip. My Audio Control spectrum analyzer can display L, R or L+R on the LED graph, but there's no comparison/difference feature.

  12. #12
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    I think the "biggest" difference between RTA's and just plain Spectrum Analyzers, is what chatwood2 stated, the RTA's are capable of producing a reference point (pink noise) and the "Real Time Analysis" end result at one time. Spectrum Analyzers just show you the "end result".

    The one thing many people never take into account (and they shouldn't, unless maybe you're employed by someone like Russ Berger Design Group, where you better know your stuff ) is actual "Material-Absorbency coefficients, acoustics and actual physical-room dimensions".

    While this has become overkill of the original topic, I haven't been to the Audiophile forum for a while and had to make sure y'all still remember me!!!



    Anyways, not having ever used iTunes, I would say maybe the iTunes EQ are mostly useless. However, if you don't have enough low-end response, nor a subwoofer, shove the speakers as close to a solid (preferably a wall) surface as possible. Without explaining the physics involved, just suffice to say that you'll get at least a little bit more low end result if you use something to throw it off of capacity.



    ------------------
    Bill

    "I made a conscience decision in a semi-conscious state"

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