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Thread: HFS+ and OS X file-copy commands

  1. #21
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    We're *that* close to having a scriptlet (a small application with a shell script inside it) to help you with the /Applications bit, by the way.

    Assuming you've moved your /Users contents to /Volumes/volname/Users, the best approach for /Applications is to make a directory /Volumes/volname/Applications and install all your "local" applications -- those that don't come with the OS -- in it. Then, for convenience, what the scriptlet will do is add a symbolic link (Unix version of an alias file) in the local-volume's Applications directory named ' root Applications' that points to the currently-booted root disk's /Applications directory. Because the name starts with a space character, it sorts at the top in the Finder in multi-column view.

    If your local volume is called Local (like mine), /Volumes/Local/Applications directory would contain (for instance):

    root Applications
    Acrobat Reader
    BBEdit
    Fetch

    and so on. Click into ' root Applications' and you're looking at the contents of the /Applications directory -- as installed with the OS -- as if it were a subdirectory of /Volumes/Local/Applications.

    Then you can replace the 'Applications' fast-path in the top of your Finder windows with the local Applications directory and use only it.

    Important: Don't move the real /Applications folder or any of its contents off your root disks! They're specifically compiled to work with the version of kernel and libraries delivered with that root disk's OS.

    Because the '/Volumes/Local/Applications/ root Applications' symlink is pointing to /Applications, it means that if you have multiple boot disks, it always takes you the applications set on the root disk that's currently booted. Very important!

    Have fun!

    Jazzbo

  2. #22
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    Y'know, for fun, you oughta read through those run control scripts. In Terminal, one of them at a time:

    # This is a comment 'cause it starts with a '#'

    #
    # Check out the main MultiUser mode rc script
    #
    cat /etc/rc

    #
    # Check out the single-user mode rc script
    #
    cat /etc/rc.boot

    #
    # Check out the shared set-em-up rc script invoked in the other two
    #
    cat /etc/rc.common

    #
    # Check out the option-defining configuration script used by the above
    #
    cat /etc/hostconfig

    #
    # Then, some interesting Manual Pages for Further Reading:
    #

    man uname # play with running this command in a second Terminal window

    #
    # Don't play with the rest of these
    #
    man ulimit
    man stty # now, *there* is a strange one! Try: stty -a
    man halt
    man sync
    man mkdir
    man mount

    Jazzbo

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Ok, I had already done a symlink of /Applications into my local (non-apple apps) applications directory, and did of course preface the name with a space so it falls first in a Finder list:

    At /Volumes/TooTall:
    Boot's Tools (containing
    Apple Root apps(symlink to /Applications)
    and (all non-apple apps))
    Users

    Since I now have multiple users on this mach, I may put all that inside /Volumes/Users...

    So you're saying don't even try moving /Applications: too much trouble-
    That this method (below) is too risky and potentially faulty...

    After mkdir at /Volumes/local and ditto rsrcFork of /Applications to it....

    quote:
    Edit the fstab file in /etc to add a line that mounts the Users partition right into /Users......


    (And presumably the same for /Applications)

    quote:
    ........Please check the tip on moving the swapfile for the procedure of creating and editing an fstab file: The following lines should be added, in which the device number can be obtained by issueing the df or mount command:
    /dev/disk0s11 /Applications hfs rw 1 2
    /dev/disk0s14 /Users hfs rw 1 2


    I have not actually edited the fstab to move .vm from /.private/var to /Volumes/ swap_disk. I used SwapCop..gave it a 1 gig partition just under my system partition, finding that moving swap onto a software-striped disk actually hindered operations..

    Thanks for the commands. I'll be llooking at those.



    [This message has been edited by Boots (edited 22 August 2002).]

  4. #24
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    You *can* move /Applications off of the root disk to its own slice, then edit the fstab to get it mounted, it's just that I wouldn't. If you do that you've set yourself up to have to go through all those steps again on two extra partitions (altroot and altApplications) if you ever need to install a new OS release clean.

    Your /etc/fstab files will differ between the two boot disks, as you'll need to mount the new altApplications volume on /Applications when booted from the altroot disk and the original Applications volume when booted from the original root disk. Obviously the swap partition's cool for either, since only one root disk will be booted at a time.

    *Yes*, I've done the same sort of thing in the past on big, production Solaris machines. What we did when we were not prepping to move to a new OS release was run nightly cronjobs to make altroot, altusr, ... exact clones of the current root and usr, while preserving the /etc/vfstab file differences. Kind of a "current is disk set a; alt is disk set b" or, at need, switch the boot disk and current becomes b, alt a. Safety valve to minimize recovery time on a disk crash.

    Took a *lot* of work to make it usable.

    Since /Applications is only really usable by one person at a time (logged in at the desktop), why go through all the hassle?

    You can dedicate a volume to Users and mount it as you said, to contain nothing but home directories. Not a bad choice. Obviously same with a swapdisk.

    Set up a Local volume to hold third-party apps and anything else that doesn't come with the OS. /Volumes/Local has Applications, usr/local, Library, ... Inside /Volumes/Local/Applications, symlink to /Applications on the current root disk.

    Just how I think about this sort of mission.

    Jazzbo

  5. #25
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    Aug 2002
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    Truth is, real world-wise its unclear to me if all of my apps on the local are really any faster than had they been installed at the default..Exploder at /Applications for one is very fast period. Apple Help Viewer by contrast has always been a dog. Photoshop on another drive is logy anyway. It seemed with 9, you could really sense the performance bene of putting apps on another drive. Maybe its because my apps are with my users, maybe thats whats doggin' them a little. The main bene of having 'm on a seperate slice obviously is not having to reinstall 'em if you have to put on a fresh boot.
    In all my experiments with this QS733 + 5 hd's, I never actually tried users, apps, and system all on seperate drives. This mach seems top heavy with hds anyway. Maybe more apropo with some backside cache dually...

    I've gone back over to here on a continue of this users relocation stuff......



    [This message has been edited by Boots (edited 23 August 2002).]

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