Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: HELP! Can't Boot Into OSX!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Hi,

    Hope someone can advise...posting from my iBook right now as I've screwed up my PMG4....

    Anyway, had the bright idea to install Linux on my G4. So thinking that I could avoid any problems by installing Linux on a separate drive. So I bought a WD 120GB drive and partitioned it into 2, about half for Linux and half for OSX. I made this the Master drive and changed my old Maxtor 120 GB the Slave.

    I installed YellowDogLinux 3 on the first partition of the new drive. Install went OK and then I booted into YDL3 OK. Worked great!

    However, when I rebooted to get back into OSX, no go. I got the gray apple at startup but that turned into circle with slash through it.

    Found out there's a partition map bug in YDL3 about this. However, there's a fix, but couldn't get it to work for me..

    So rebooted and held down option key and I can see my OSX Partition, my OS9 partition,and the Linux partition. When I boot into OS9 it boots up OK but then the only thing I can do is move the cursor around, buttons on my trackball don't work.

    So I removed new drive and changed old drive back to Master. Still same thing....

    I've tried Apple Drive Utility on Jaguar disk but it only sees my drive not the partitions.

    Tried Drive10 but same thing and therefore has no available options for repairs.

    Tried DiskWarrior (old version) but wouldn't boot!

    Tried TechToolPro v3.07. It boots into OS9 but with same trackball problems...

    Tried starting in single-user mode so that I could try fsck -y command. But didn't get to prompt...went through most of startup stuff onscreen then I got a line saying 'still waiting for root device'. After a few minutes it repeated that line again. And again......

    Anyone got any suggestions besides reformatting hard drive?

    thanks!

    Mark

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Default

    I've read through but haven't tried YDL... have you tried booting from OS X Install CD and partitioning the drive with YDL?
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> If you have a "New World ROM" machine (Blue & Whites and newer) you may use "yaboot" (an Open Firmware bootloader) to boot directly into Yellow Dog Linux without the use of the Mac OS.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE> Which suggests they may have messed up OF and the boot blocks. Disk Warrior is usual fix for boot block problems.

    Open Firmware reset

    reset-nvram
    set-defaults
    reset-all

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Lost Mac OS and have 2 drives?
    If you are unable to boot OS 9 or OS X after installing v3.0, chances are you have experienced a bug affecting systems with two hard drives. The fix has been documented at this howto.

    If you have this problem and cannot get it resolved for whatever reason, please contact Dan Burcaw (dburcaw at terrasoftsolutions dot com) and he will walk you through the procedure.

    Mac OS X-based fix
    The Mac OS X-based fix may be necessary if you did not successfully install Yellow Dog Linux 3.0. However, since the bug prevents OS X booting, this method will only work if you have another means to get into OS X.

    One method to access OS X would be to use a rescue CD, such as BootCD. Another method is to install a second OS X setup on the drive you intended to run Linux on. Once you have access an OS X installation on your system, a version of 'pdisk' compiled for OS X will need to be downloaded. Steps for doing this as well as using it to fix your partition map are available here


    Rescue mode
    Yellow Dog Linux v3.0 rescue mode is available by inserting Install CD 1 and then entering the following text at the boot prompt:
    install rescue [ENTER] <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    [This message was edited by Gregory on Sat June 28, 2003 PT at 14:02.]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Default

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> I have compiled a version of 'pdisk' for OS X allowing the repair of the Apple_partition_map bug. Since this bug prevents OS X booting to begin with, the following assumes you have found another way into OS X. For instance, via BootCD (www.charlessoft.com) or installing another OS X system on another drive.

    Before proceeding, you need to download the 'pdisk' version compiled for OS X. It is located at:
    http://stage.terraplex.com/~dburcaw/pdisk_OSX.gz

    After it is downloaded, move the file to the top level of your OS X Home directory. The following instructions are to be followed from the Mac OS X "Terminal" application located in Applications -&gt; Utilities.

    1) Ungzip and run pdisk_OSX with root privledges.

    [Dan-Burcaws-Computer:~] dburcaw% gunzip pdisk_OSX.gz
    [Dan-Burcaws-Computer:~] dburcaw% sudo ./pdisk_OSX
    Password:
    Top level command (? for help):

    2) Find out which drive has partition 1 incorrectly labeled "Apple_Bootstrap" instead of "Apple_partition_map" by typing "L" at the pdisk prompt.

    Top level command (? for help): L
    /dev/rdisk0 map block size=512
    #: type name length base ( size )
    1: Apple_Bootstrap Apple 63 @ 1
    2: Apple_UNIX_SVR2 untitled 156355500 @ 64 ( 74.6G)
    3: Apple_Free Extra 20 @ 156355564

    Device block size=512, Number of Blocks=156355584
    DeviceType=0x0, DeviceId=0x0

    pdisk: can't open file '/dev/rdisk1' (No such file or directory)
    pdisk: can't open file '/dev/rdisk2' (No such file or directory)
    pdisk: can't open file '/dev/rdisk3' (No such file or directory)
    pdisk: can't open file '/dev/rdisk4' (No such file or directory)
    pdisk: can't open file '/dev/rdisk5' (No such file or directory)
    pdisk: can't open file '/dev/rdisk6' (No such file or directory)

    In my case, only /dev/rdisk0 is present, and it does have the problem
    since partition #1 has an incorrect type of "Apple_Bootstrap".


    3) Edit the drive with problem by typing "e" at pdisk prompt. After that, specify the drive that is incorrectly labeled. In my case, this is /dev/rdisk0.
    (the device for the problem drive was determined in step 2)

    Top level command (? for help): e
    Name of device: /dev/rdisk0


    4) Change the type of partition #1 to "Apple_partition_map" by typing "t" at the pdisk prompt. When prompted for partition type, enter "Apple_partition_map" without quotes, precisely as indicated.

    Command (? for help): t
    Partition number: 1
    New partition type: Apple_partition_map

    5) Print the map to verify that partition #1 no longer has the incorrect type "Apple_Bootstrap" but now has the type Apple_partition_map". Do this by typing "p" at the pdisk prompt. If everything looks good, proceed to the next step. Otherwise, go back and make sure you have done everything correctly.

    Command (? for help): p
    /dev/rdisk0 map block size=512
    #: type name length base ( size )
    1: Apple_partition_map Apple 63 @ 1
    2: Apple_UNIX_SVR2 untitled 156355500 @ 64 ( 74.6G)
    3: Apple_Free Extra 20 @ 156355564

    Device block size=512, Number of Blocks=156355584
    DeviceType=0x0, DeviceId=0x0


    6) If everything looks good in the previous step, write the changes via the "w" command at the pdisk prompt.

    Command (? for help): w
    Writing the map destroys what was there before.
    Is that okay? [n/y]: y
    The partition table has been altered!

    7) Quit editing current disk by typing "q" at pdisk prompt.

    Command (? for help): q

    8) If another drive was listed in step #2 with partition 1 as type
    "Apple_Bootstrap" and not "Apple_partition_map", go back to step #3
    and repeat the steps to fix that drive as well. Otherwise, skip
    this step and go to step 9.

    9) Quit pdisk by typing "q" at the prompt.

    Top level command (? for help): q
    The end
    [Dan-Burcaws-Computer:~] dburcaw%

    10) Verify that OS X now boots properly.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Default

    I recently saw a tip on how to bless a system from command line in single user startup mode (assuming you can boot that far!).

    I can search around for it, it was on bbs.xlr8yourmac.com and was proably linked and mentioned in the OS X Forum here, or not, maybe under the Troubleshooting FAQ even.

    I really really like to insist on cloning OS X so you have it on another drive and/or volumes so you can boot into your emergency system rather than using a CD or something.

    It's good to have a cloned backup before updating to the next revision of OS X, or installing 3rd party drivers. Takes about 20 minutes (if you don't include all the huge data and media files in /Users/ in which case skip /Users and just copy/create the `/Library folder.

    You may be able to bless your existing OS X system, or even OS 9. But I think you need to do the OF reset.

    I hate to see someone have to use pdisk etc.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>From May 9th from YDL

    Yellow Dog Linux Users,

    This new driver provides full access to HFS+ plus volumes under Linux. It is based upon the driver by Brad Boyer (sourceforge) and now supports full read and write access and has a better perfomance. It also supports hard links and the resource fork is accessible via /rsrc.

    http://www.ussg.iu.edu/hypermail/lin...05.0/1603.html

    --Terra Soft
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Default

    They recommend using pdisk to create the hfs boot partition and the other slices. I assume you took half the drive, then repartitioned it during install?

    And that the rescue routine didn't work either.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>On Wed May 21 2003, Felix Jodoin wrote:

    &gt; No, It's linux rescue. I should know, I used it today; to boot linux off a drive with this you can type: linux rescue root=/dev/hda* (* is the number of the linux root drive.)

    No, I think that's what you can do if you just need to re-run ybin.
    If your root partition is possibly screwed up, you don't want to specify it as your root to boot from. I believe the "install rescue" probably uses an initrd to boot from, so you can then safely for example fsck /dev/hdaX where X is the root partition. I hope I have that straight but as I said earlier I haven't actually tried it myself.

    And I would hope TerraSoft wouldn't make such a blunder on their
    main Support web page.

    -Bill <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Do you have another mouse you can use if the one you have seems to be trouble? one thing that they do recommend is removing USB and other devices... and we know USB hubs and devices can be trouble even with OS X 10.2.5.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Hi Gregory,

    Wow! Thanks so much for your detailed responses!!

    Well, diddled around since my post and made a teeny bit of progress....

    I can now boot OK into OS9 and use mouse/keyboard normally. All I did was change from my Kensington trackball back to Apple mouse...

    So I can see my 2 drive partitions and open them up normally and see all my files are there OK!

    Ran DW that I had installed in OS9 and replaced directory on the OSX partition.

    However, when I tried rebooting back to OSX, no go still... ;-(

    Did try starting up in verbose mode...
    However, just as before I didn't get to prompt...went through most of startup stuff onscreen then I got a line saying 'still waiting for root device'. After a few minutes it repeated that line again. And again......

    Just printed out your posts and will study them carefully and report back later....

    Thanks!

    Mark

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Default

    ... sounds like your system needs the OS X volume blessed. DW would have done that, and using Startup Disk cp should also.

    I just wanted to put all the things that might go into "tried all the things YDL recommended" so anyone would know, or as a check-list. I've been thinking about pouring money into a 7300 to run YDL3 myself, so I have a vested interested in the topic, too!

    If you can boot from OS X CD, that would be nice and might help, too.

    You can learn more than you want or bargin for about Openfirmware TN2001 that is the ultimate recovery tool perhaps, too.

    [This message was edited by Gregory on Sun June 29, 2003 PT at 13:31.]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Mobius Strip
    Posts
    13,045

    Default

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>TOPIC: Where did the yaboot menu go?

    2) Reset firmware.
    If during the installation of YDL you placed the 10 MB boot partition after either Mac OS 9 or X partitions (as instructed with pre-YDL 2.2): Reboot your computer. Immediately after the chime, hold the OPTION-APPLE-O-F keys and your screen should go to a gray or white background with black text. At the command prompt:

    printenv [ENTER]
    (this will scroll a number of settings on your screen)

    setenv boot-device hd:x,\\:tbxi [ENTER]
    (where 'hd' is an IDE drive and 'x' is the partition number where yaboot is located. If you are booting from a SCSI drive, you may try running through portions of the YDL Installer, as described below in the next option, further down this page).

    printenv [ENTER]
    (to make certain your settings took)

    boot [ENTER]
    (this should momentarily blank the screen to black and then to the boot screen for 'Linux, Mac OS, or CD")

    Do NOT change any other settings as you can really mess things up. If you could not help yourself, 'zapping the PRAM' sets your Mac back to factory settings. This is done by holding the OPTION-APPLE-P-R keys immediately after the boot chime. Continue to hold them until your Mac chimes 5 times. Then let go and it will boot to the first bootable partition available. This may change your mouse speed and memory preferences.


    3) Use the NewWorld ROM OPTION key
    A little known function of later versions of NewWorld ROM is a GUI interface offered when you hold the OPTION key immediately upon powering-on. This screen will provide a GUI (mouse and all) for selecting the OS that you wish to boot with. Keep in mind that this only works for OSs that are on unique partitions. If Mac OS 9 and Mac OS X are on the same partition, only one will show.

    YDL3 Boot Rescue <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •