Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: using dreamweaver mx....also use virtual pc?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    387

    Default

    Hi,

    I will be designing a website for a grant project. I'm going to be using Dreamweaver MX. I want to be able to see how the site will look on several kinds of browsers. I have a pc and I could install dreamweaver on the pc also, and basically duplicate the website on it, or I could do it all on my mac. If I do it all on my mac, would something virtual pc work, to allow me to get a view from the pc side, or do I need something entirely different?

    Thanks,
    Laura

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY, 11226
    Posts
    97

    Default

    Hi Laura,

    There are a few variables to consider here - lifestyle (or desk space) and hardware. If your Mac is up to the task you could do it all on one system. Design in Dreamweaver on Mac, test Mac browsers on Mac, test PC browsers in Virtual PC.

    I've found that Virtual PC will give you identical results to a real one (all the same alignment problems and such) and by using only the Mac you'll get to keep some room on your table for scratch paper or a potted plant or a nice glass of tea.

    The downside will be speed. Having OS X, OS 9, and Windows 2k open on one machine all at the same time can be a bit of a strain. I've got a G4/450AGP/1GB RAM and it feels a little slow - like I could be saving some time by just running the PC stuff on the PC.

    If you've got 800Mhz or dual processors on the Mac - go for it!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    387

    Default

    Hi Strayduck,

    Yes, I have a new dual processor, 1 ghz. It's been having crashing problems, but hopefully that's been fixed. I'm a new mac person, so am learning about the system. I would like to design the site on the mac, but also be able to access the site on my pc also.

    I'm new to web site design, so will be taking a class, reading books on it, etc.

    I'm glad to hear about Virutal PC. I'll check into it, and see what's the latest version.

    Thanks for you advice.

    Laura

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    693

    Default

    Make sure you check out the O'Reilly series of books on all matters web-related.

    Web Design in a Nutshell is by far the most worthwhile single book on web design out there, and will help you design with cross-platform viewability in mind.

    As to your PC-viewing situation, the best way to ensure your site looks similar on a PC is to 1) design with the PC in mind, (see above), and 2) preview it on a real PC once a week, reference book in hand, so you can understand why it looks slightly different.

    Top few issues/tweaks:
    - If you are using Photoshop, use the PC color settings to make sure your graphics don't look way darker on the PC
    - Don't try to use full-screen graphics; the PC and Mac versions of IE and Netscape have different width scrollbars and title bars.
    - Mac browsers display fonts one size smaller than on a PC. So, make sure you keep all fonts and style sheets that affect font size a little bit larger than you'd like on the Mac, and see how they look on a PC.
    - Go easy on the JavaScript. If you are a beginning designer, this should not be an issue, but some people are gluttons for punishment...

    hth

    -ripper

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Denver, Co
    Posts
    631

    Default

    Using VPC is ahead of me also. I picked up an older version of VPC recently. It uses Windows 98. I assume this would be adequate for checking web browsers on a PC? I don't know what VPC is going to do to my disk so I have been a little hesitant to just load it up. Does VPC need a separate partition on a drive? I have lots of spare 2 gig drives laying around. Should I just format one of then as a PC disk and install VPC there? IS there any need to format that way for VPC at all?

    I was imagining that eventually I would set it up on my old 9600 and run a crossover cable to it. I certainly don't see a need for VPC most of the time. But as I am now working hard on my web site (Freeway rocks), it is definitely a need I have. Thanks for this continued thread.

    lb

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY, 11226
    Posts
    97

    Default

    Yes, you will need a separate 2GIG partition on your HD to create your C: drive to put windows on.

    I haven't created a C: drive on a separate HD but I'm going to go out on a limb and say you can as you can create your D: drive, etc. on one using VPC's 'virtual disk assistant'.

    If you can get your hands on a Windows 2000 upgrade disc it will be helpful. Not only are more users on it, but it will run considerably faster on your Mac (not sure why this is).

    One interesting problem that I've run into (and haven't quite worked out yet) is this: upon upgrading to Win2k and installing a dozen or so apps, I found I filled up my 2gig partition, which in turn, messed up my PC's scratch disk, which in turn brought VPC down in flames.

    I had to reinstall everything from scratch.

    If there are any PC heads in the crowd I'd be interested to know more about FAT, FAT32, etc. and see if there is a way that I can increase my disk size w/o erasing everything again OR see how I can create a properly formatted C: drive of any size - VPC 5.x doesn't have that built in. Time for an upgrade?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    387

    Default

    ripper,

    Thanks so much for the advice. I'll definitely get a copy of web design in a nutshell. I've been thinking about getting a general book on web design, but didn't know how to begin to choose.

    I'm not a linear thinker, more of an artist type, so I could code if my life depended on it, but Dreamweaver bill itself as pretty visual and intuitive, so I guess I'll be ok. I'm aiming to have the website up in a year/year and a half. Hopefully, this will give me time to learn about my mac and about cross platforming.

    ps...I looked at VPC...wow, it's expensive!

    Laura

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY, 11226
    Posts
    97

    Default

    I agree with Ripper, the O'Reilly books are some of the best there are. Also highly recommended for artistic types is:
    http://www.htmlbook.com/ (found on: http://www.lynda.com/)

    This is the book I started on and reall appreciated that fact that it was half images. O'Reilley is great at explaining color theory, but wouldn't you also like to have a full color chart of all the 256 web colors with their hexidecimal values.

    Anyway, with this book and rippers you will have a real springboard to get started.

    Cheers.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Denver, Co
    Posts
    631

    Default

    OK, when I first read your post I didn't fully understand how far along you were with your project. Please take this as my opinions only, but, I would hope that you take a good look at Freeway by http://www.softpress.com Try the demo.

    I am also artistically minded. And I looked high and low before I came across Freeway. It is easy, intuitive and it plays on the level of the big boys (Dreamweaver, Golive, etc). Or at least it says it does, I am still very new to it but I am very delighted with it so far.

    It's more like quark where you layout a page visually. It takes care of generating all the code and uploading it for you. You can also do a lot of drag and drop stuff, which is much better than all the converting you normally have to remember to do. Anyway, which ever direction you choose, good luck.

    lb

    [This message has been edited by levelbest (edited 21 February 2003).]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    693

    Default

    That said, I would claim that the only thing that will save you from serious frustration is the ability to get into the HTML, if not on a daily basis, at least enough to correct flaws that are introduced through the interpretation of the visual editor (Dreamweaver, FrontPage, etc.).

    If you have a year and a half, you have time to learn enough so that it can be fun, rather than ridiculously complex. Good luck, and keep us informed.
    Please feel free to email me directly with questions at any time. I will usually answer within a few days.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    387

    Default

    -ripper,

    Thanks for the encouragment and your invitation to contact you!

    Laura

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •