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jordachio
04-30-2010, 11:05 AM
Hi there-

I just got my pretty new MacBook Pro 15" Spring 2010 and I'm thinking about upgrading the hard drive. I was interested in the large capacity WD drives here: http://www.wdc.com/en/products/products.asp?driveid=685 but I see that they use the new Advanced Format Technology (AFT) that causes problems with Windows XP due to WinXP disk partitioning (article here: http://hothardware.com/Articles/WDs-1TB-Caviar-Green-w-Advanced-Format-Windows-XP-Users-Pay-Attention/?page=1).

My question is, could I still run WinXP in Parallels with one of these disks installed? Would I need the WD software tool in order to do this? Do you envision other problems with this drive?

Thanks for any advice-
Jordan

ricks
04-30-2010, 12:31 PM
I am afraid I don't know much about the Scorpio model. Not tried them. Anytime you start adding in features you can have compatibility issues. Hence, so far, we have stuck with the Hitachi and Seagate notebook drives for the last few years.

Someone else may have some experiences to share with you.l.


Rick

cowboyonamac
04-30-2010, 01:24 PM
I will NEVER ever run a WD drive again.

They simply make too many "lemons", for the number of drives they produce, and their support for them is absolutely terrible to say the least.

When I upgraded my late 2009 MacBook 13 HD, I went with a Seagate Momentus 5400 RPM 320 Gb. ($64 at BestBuy and about ten minutes to install it)

I had the option of going to a 7200 RPM for $40 more, but the OEM drive is 5400 RPM and I haven't run into any issues at that speed with what I use this MBP for.

I've had five WD drives over the last seven years, both internal and external, and of those three have failed prematurely due to hardware problems. Two were still under warranty, and WD wanted me to pay MORE in shipping to "have them look at it" (not fix it, but determine if they could get out of a repair) than it would cost to replace the drive.

That's just my $0.02

jordachio
04-30-2010, 01:31 PM
To Ricks: The compelling thing to me is the space issue. Also, WD drives tend to be cheaper I think. Not sure I'm aware of a 750 or 1tb offering from Hitachi or Seagate. Am I missing any?

To Cowboy: See above - WD drives are cheaper and as a result, one could draw the conclusion that it's because the quality is worse than competitors. That being said, I haven't actually had any problems with any WD drives (fingers crossed). I've had one of those little Passport portable drives for 3+ years banging around in my laptop bag and everything's still good. I also replaced the drives on my two previous MBP's with large capacity WD drives and never had a problem. I may be a special case as only 1 hard drive has ever failed on me in maybe 11 years of HD usage. Can't remember whether it was WD...

In any event, opinions about the drive aside, I'm really trying to figure out if anyone has implemented one of these AFT drives successfully and if so, how they handle WinXP in Parallels.

Thanks!

cowboyonamac
04-30-2010, 10:47 PM
"opinions about the drive aside, I'm really trying to figure out if anyone has implemented one of these AFT drives successfully and if so, how they handle WinXP in Parallels."

A cautious Windows user would tell you:

AFT should be treated like Vista in 2007, Windows 7 last fall, or XP in 2000.

It'll most likely be "buggy" for the first few years, and you'll probably be better off waiting till they get it right to buy a drive based solely on whether it has it or not.

There's a tremendous selection of drives out there that DON'T have it and still run just fine.

jordachio
05-01-2010, 08:27 AM
Sound advice. That's been my impression as well and I already have a 500GB drive in the MBP, so I'm probably pretty well off without it for now. An upgrade to 640 or 750 doesn't seem quite worthwhile, but 1TB is pretty compelling so I'll keep an eye on it.

As long as AFT sticks around, however, I'm still curious about whether anyone has installed it an run WinXP in Parallels.

unclemac
05-01-2010, 10:49 AM
Sorry, don't think anybody I know has installed one and has done the bootcamp thing.

But I would agree that a VM should be OK as there is no formatting going on. That's just a hunch though.

Oh, and watch out for some of the larger 2.5" drives. At least one model adds a platter, and they are too thick to fit in most laptops. I know of one person who recently bought a 750 that would not fit in a MacBook or Mini. Found out the hard way.

.....so review the tech specs and pay attention to the drive thickness, compared to a "standard" drive case dimension.

cowboyonamac
05-02-2010, 02:39 AM
Oh, and watch out for some of the larger 2.5" drives. At least one model adds a platter, and they are too thick to fit in most laptops. I know of one person who recently bought a 750 that would not fit in a MacBook or Mini. Found out the hard way.

It'll be nice when SSD becomes the norm for laptops, and space is no longer a problem.

jordachio
05-03-2010, 08:37 AM
To clarify, I would be running a VM in Parallels, not boot camp. That's great news if the virtual disk isn't partitioned the same way!

Unlcemac: The size issue has been the big problem with these newer large-capacity 2.5" drives but I recently read a review from someone who claims that the 12.5 mm drive fits in unibody MacBook pros (his article had pictures of the install). He says it's the same height as the new batteries hence my curiosity. Even more compelling are some of the comments of what power users have done to replace the optical drive with a SSD boot drive, leaving a 1TB internal scratch disk or additional storage. (It seems like at least one of them is using it as a time machine backup which seems silly to me. Why backup a portable machine inside the portable machine? What if you loose the computer??)

Either way, SSD boot with internal 1TB storage on a laptop sounds AWESOME.

Cowboy: The above might address the SSD issue for you, at least for now until the prices start to come down. I'm going to give it some thought for this new machine. I would have to buy an external optical drive but would hardly ever need it.

unclemac
05-03-2010, 06:17 PM
I agree.......If I had two HDs and or SSDs in a MBP, it would not be for backup!

I like the idea.....I miss the old G3 PB design where the optical drive was modular, and one could swap out a second HD, a second battery, or nothing (for less travel weight). Have you seen this (http://echeng.com/journal/2009/04/18/raid-0-striped-intel-x25-m-160gb-ssd-drives-macbook-pro-17-unibody/)?

jordachio
05-03-2010, 07:12 PM
I have seen that, actually. There are a lot of compelling upgrade kits out there. If only the computer didn't already cost me $2500!! :)