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momo
03-30-2008, 08:24 AM
I'll be getting a new MacBook Pro in a few weeks, 11 April, and from what I've been reading here the thing to do is to zero the drive and re-install the OS? Is that right?

I kinda want to re-install the OS just to get rid of stuff I won't need, drivers, etc...and minimize the size of the OS...that sounds right...

any suggestions for a partition size to accomodate the OS and my applications?...I mean I thought to do files on a separate partition in case i need to re-install the OS...I know I can't move the users folder anywhere with a portable...but I was thinking to back it up on an external drive...

a partition on my hard drive now with OS and applications reads close to 7gb...

thanks for any suggestions...I've never had a portable before...

M

unclemac
03-30-2008, 02:05 PM
Congratulations.

Many here that partition, but I usually don't, at least on laptops. 10.5 is pretty fat, even if you trim out printer drivers you don't need and such, so I usually end up having space issues on a laptop with a partition. Also, you really run out fast if you want to run Fusion or Parrallels, and BootCamp used to not allow installation on a partitioned drive, though I have not used it since the beta with 10.4. And, you can actually repartion on the fly (non-destructively) with Disk Utility in 10.5.

I would suggest reinstalling the OS from scratch as you planned. Never hurts, plus helps to be comfortable with the process. If you want to shave space there are third party tools that will let you remove extra languages that you will never need..........can save several GBs of space.

Do setup an external backup no matter what. Laptops run hotter, get bumped, dropped and stolen, and some folks think that their drives just fail more often. Beyond securing your data, it is also very helpful to do a full bootable clone before any big updates. If the update goes badly you can always roll back to your clone very easily.

rwm
03-30-2008, 02:08 PM
Zeroing a drive out sure can't hurt. I often just erase/format. How big of hard drive will it have? What or how much space does your "data" take or will you need "growth". You might even slow things down by the partition - the drive heads running all over. I've done nearly the same thing myself ... it's a matter of tenths of seconds. I'd put Sys/Apps/Data on one drive with a "Data Folder" to copy and backup. Re direct iTunes library etc.

I hate to advise a drive/partition size because everyone, every computer has different needs there are so many factors. If you do partition... I don't run a lot of extras but would want my System/Apps using Tiger to be at least 40/60GB or larger - thats my needs. Leopard I have no clue if more is better to run smoothly.

eric
03-31-2008, 12:23 AM
Basically what everyone else said; go ahead and wipe the disc and install from scratch. Usually with the installers on the machine discs, you have the option of say not installing 3d party trials, demos, etc. That can help keep things clean. iWork, Office trials are usually ones I don't install because I own them.

I agree with unclemac, that with laptops I usually don't partition as I do with towers. The heads really have to move around a lot. That said I do have a Boot Camp partition.

momo
03-31-2008, 03:12 AM
the hard drive will be either 200 or 250gb...

i'll zero it and re-install the OS to get rid of stuff i don't need...free up as much space as possible...

try it without partitions and see how it goes...no need for fusion or to share my drive with pc software and OS...

the whole drive will be backed up via a burly enclosure, just in case...

ordering it tomorrow or wednesday...my first new 'puter in eight years...kind of a small rush...

kind regards

M

momo
05-21-2008, 05:41 AM
Just wanted to thank you all for your kind advice...

Rick, the burly enclosure is great, fast, quiet, all I need...hope to be adding the last two drives shortly...thanks for all your help...

Wound up with the base MacBook Pro...oh, my, god,...I don't know how to compare it to my eight year old g4 450, i guess one can't...more than very fast, the larger photoshop files do just fly...and so far 10.5.2 and my upgrades to CS3 for work applications, photoshop, illustrator and indesign works perfectly...not experiencing any problems...

so, I'm a happy camper...

the only little thing I'd complain about...how come 750gb drives only give me 698gb of useable space?...I bought one in france and three from rick and they're all the same...once formatted and ready to use I lose 52gb of space...that's lots of gb's...truth in advertising...i think they should be packaged as 698gb drives...

ok, that's all I got...kind regards...

M

eric
05-21-2008, 06:04 AM
the only little thing I'd complain about...how come 750gb drives only give me 698gb of useable space?...I bought one in france and three from rick and they're all the same...once formatted and ready to use I lose 52gb of space...that's lots of gb's...truth in advertising...i think they should be packaged as 698gb drives...Nothing wrong with the drives. Comes down to a difference in decimal v. binary measurements; see this Seagate faq (http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.jsp?locale=en-US&name=Storage_Capacity_Measurement_Standards_-_Seagate_Technology&vgnextoid=9493781e73d5d010VgnVCM100000dd04090aRCRD ) for instance.

Hard drives are marketed in decimal in your case as 750GB. But your computer speaks binary, hence the lower capacity that you reported is what the computer sees (taking into account small files, etc.)

Truth in advertising...it's been this way for decades. In fact there have been a number of cases about this very problem lodged against computer and hard drive makers, basically because most consumers don't know this issue. I think none of them wants to be the first & only one who rates their HDs correctly in binary because they will seem smaller compared to everyone else still marketing in decimal. Usually there are asterisks and comments that formatted capacity will be lower than the advertised capacity, buried at the bottom of the specifications -- Apple included. An unfortunate situation that we all find ourselves with.

momo
05-21-2008, 06:55 AM
Nothing wrong with the drives. Comes down to a difference in decimal v. binary measurements; see this Seagate faq (http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.jsp?locale=en-US&name=Storage_Capacity_Measurement_Standards_-_Seagate_Technology&vgnextoid=9493781e73d5d010VgnVCM100000dd04090aRCRD ) for instance.

Hard drives are marketed in decimal in your case as 750GB. But your computer speaks binary, hence the lower capacity that you reported is what the computer sees (taking into account small files, etc.)

Truth in advertising...it's been this way for decades. In fact there have been a number of cases about this very problem lodged against computer and hard drive makers, basically because most consumers don't know this issue. I think none of them wants to be the first & only one who rates their HDs correctly in binary because they will seem smaller compared to everyone else still marketing in decimal. Usually there are asterisks and comments that formatted capacity will be lower than the advertised capacity, buried at the bottom of the specifications -- Apple included. An unfortunate situation that we all find ourselves with.

I didn't think anything was wrong with the drives, I'm used to seeing this discrepancy, just surprised by how much less than 750gb there really is...

unclemac
05-21-2008, 08:53 AM
It's a percentage thing. Nobody much cared when drives were less than 10 GB, but everybody notices when they snap up a 1 TB drive and something like 75 GB just vanishes........:)

Nicolas
05-21-2008, 10:20 AM
It is the difference between GB and GIB
2<sup>30</sup> Byte = 1.073.741.824 Byte

750 GB = 750.000 : 1073 = 698,9748.... = 698 GB/GIB

Regards

Nicolas

ricks
05-21-2008, 10:31 AM
The thing to remember is that the numbers are identical.

698 GBytes in binary IS the identical same number as 750 GBytes in decimal.


They each represent the exact same number of bits. You have lost nothing. You have exactly 750GBytes, in decimal system, of storage. Just a different way of counting.

Rick

Nicolas
05-21-2008, 11:40 AM
Sure but its the Byte thing 1KB = 1000Byte by using SI method like the HD vendors do BUT the OS measures 1KB =1024Byte added and added you have to calculate with 1073,741824 till 1TB .

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byte

750GB Hard Drive = around 698GB formated
500 GB Hard Drive = around 465GB formated
250 GB Hard Drive = around 232GB formated

Regards

Nicolas