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Nicolas
11-20-2005, 04:40 PM
The abbreviation MAMP stands for: Macintosh, Apache, Mysql and PHP.
With just a few mouse-clicks, you can install Apache, PHP and MySQL for Mac OS X!

Often sought-after and now available from webEdition Software, MAMP installs a local server enviroment in a matter of seconds on your Mac OS X computer, be it PowerBook or iMac. Like similar packages from the Windows- and Linux-world, MAMP comes free of charge.

MAMP is installed in the typical Mac fashion: very easily. MAMP will not compromise any existing Apache installation already running with your OS X. You can install Apache, PHP and MySQL without starting a script or having to change any configuration files!

What's more, if MAMP is no longer needed, it is sufficient to delete the MAMP folder and everything returns to its original status (i.e. MAMP does not modify any of the "normal" OS X).

http://www.mamp.info/en/home/

TZ
12-05-2005, 04:23 AM
Directory Services: Easy Ways To Integrate Mac and Windows Servers (http://www.informit.com/articles/article.asp?p=430213&rl=1)

TZ
12-05-2005, 04:38 AM
Apache 2.2 Released
http://www.apache.org/dist/httpd/Announcement2.2.html

Apache HTTP server 2.2.0 has been released. This version of Apache is a major release and the start of a new stable branch. New features include Smart Filtering, Improved Caching, AJP Proxy, Proxy Load Balancing, Graceful Shutdown support, Large File Support, the Event MPM, and refactored Authentication/Authorization.

revi
12-24-2005, 09:14 PM
Hello!

But I'm just not that big a fan of PHP...

As alternatives, I'd also investigate:

JBoss on OS X:

http://developer.apple.com/internet/java/enterprisejava.html

JBoss is a servlet/JSP container. JBoss is also free (check jboss.org). Personally, I'd go Java over PHP.

2.) Maybe better yet, if you don't mind spending a "little" $$: ColdFusion

Well, "little" is about 1.2 kilobux street price, but IMHO, ColdFusion blows PHP cleanly out of the water. ColdFusion preceded PHP (and ASP, and JSP...really, only perl has been around longer as a web app language) and is, again IMHO, vastly more elegant and powerful than PHP. ColdFusion (CF), being made by Macromedia (now part of Adobe) also has built-in compatibility with Flash (e.g. Flash forms, etc.).

http://www.macromedia.com/software/coldfusion/?promoid=BINO

I've been using CF for almost 10 years and have also done development in ASP, PHP and JSP. CF is by far the most rapid-development platform I've used for web apps. The "Flash forms" stuff is super, super cool.

Ok, I apologize for my ranting! ;-) But, if you're looking for web application servers for OS X, I'd look into these others too.

Best,

Iver

unclemac
12-24-2005, 09:37 PM
Cool, thanks Revi.

What do you think of Ruby on Rails (http://www.rubyonrails.org/)?

Nicolas
12-25-2005, 10:04 AM
I've been using CF for almost 10 years and have also done development in ASP, PHP and JSP. CF is by far the most rapid-development platform I've used for web apps. The "Flash forms" stuff is super, super cool.

Ok, I apologize for my ranting! ;-) But, if you're looking for web application servers for OS X, I'd look into these others too.

Hello Revi,

for sure, CF is a powerfull tool but, as you also said, not for free.

I posted this mainly for "non Unix/Linux/Server" users, who want an home WWW server for checking their sites first or users wanting to see how things work with the option to remove everything very painless.

Another great tool is Webmin (http://www.webmin.com/).

Webmin is a web-based interface for system administration for Unix. Using any browser that supports tables and forms (and Java for the File Manager module), you can setup user accounts, Apache, DNS, file sharing and so on.

Webmin consists of a simple web server, and a number of CGI programs which directly update system files like /etc/inetd.conf and /etc/passwd. The web server and all CGI programs are written in Perl version 5, and use no non-standard Perl modules.

More helpful stuff:
Apache Tomcat, JBoss (http://www.jboss.com/developers/index)
Eclipse (http://www.eclipse.org/)


Great info about CF!

Good to hear from you, been a while, best whishes and happy holidays to you and your family!

Best regards

Nicolas

revi
12-31-2005, 06:06 PM
Cool, thanks Revi.

What do you think of Ruby on Rails (http://www.rubyonrails.org/)?

Ruby on Rails along with AJAX and more "standards oriented" CSS web development is very much on my to-learn list.

As regards the CSS and other good stuff, you might enjoy checking out:

CSS Zen Garden:

http://www.csszengarden.com

A web-based "wiki":

http://www.tiddlywiki.com/

A CSS-based slideshow:

http://www.meyerweb.com/eric/tools/s5/

A neat little color utility (not CSS or particularly nouveau, but quite cool):

http://www.visibone.com/colorlab/

Lots o' fun stuff!

Best,

Iver

revi
12-31-2005, 06:26 PM
for sure, CF is a powerfull tool but, as you also said, not for free.


Nicolas, I can't resist and I hope you'll forgive me for using the traditional response to people who say that PCs are cheaper than Macs...

...well, in terms of up-front cost, possibly, but in the long run... ;-)

If a person is looking to set up a small server for private use and is not looking at doing a lot of development, I completely agree with you. Also, if a person is just getting into web development, I can see this too.

However, one should also caution people that...and I've seen this time and again over the last 9-going-on-10 years of doing web development for my (primary) living, that _maintenance_ is the hidden cost that rarely gets mentioned.

Site maintenance and upkeep is, to my mind, the greatest argument against ASP/.NET/ASPX development...and only adds to the argument that ASP/VB coding is (to my mind) about the ugliest and clumsiest way to go.

Yet a lot of people will say, "Well, my Microsoft NT/2K server comes with IIS and .NET/ASP bundled for free, so that's what I'm going to use."

And then they spend many times more on development, redevelopment, bug fixes, constant patching, etc. etc.

Now, I'm in no way saying that PHP is anywheres near as bad, but that the 1.2 kilobux that a person could spend...invest in...CF may pay many more times the dividends.

Check this out for some really, really impressive CF development:

http://www.asfusion.com/blog/examples/

A lot of these examples use dynamically generated Flash...super cool! Oh, and most of the source code is there for free downloads!





I posted this mainly for "non Unix/Linux/Server" users, who want an home WWW server for checking their sites first or users wanting to see how things work with the option to remove everything very painless.


I hear you one-hundred percent. This is a very good idea: when a person gets into the web, there are initial choices that can make life much easier...or much more difficult!

I was just trying to add some more info...the fact that CF is now "officially" available for OS X I think is great news (there had been some hacks as CF has been available on Linux for some time).

Not to be too much of a CF evangelizer (and I admit I am doing so on this one job as I know I would save my client a _great_ deal of money in development time if they did), but note that you can install CF on an OS X box and use the 127.0.0.1/loopback/localhost address to do all your development on one machine (which you can also do using PHP and others, though it's, IMHO, easiest with CF).

Oh, and the developer version of CF (which is the same thing as the commercial version, except it can only respond to like 3 IP addresses) is a free download from Macromedia:

http://www.macromedia.com/software/coldfusion/

(good links on the right hand side and a link above to go to "Downloads")





Another great tool is Webmin (http://www.webmin.com/).


I'll have to check this out!





More helpful stuff:
Apache Tomcat, JBoss (http://www.jboss.com/developers/index)
Eclipse (http://www.eclipse.org/)


Oh yes, as noted, I'm a definite believer in JSP! I did just run across some development issues where the solution in JSP was _way_ more verbose than in CF (gee, when will I ever shut up about this CF stuff! ;-)

In fact, I was just asking a cohort of mine at this particular job if he had heard about the next version of JSP. JSP 2.0 came out 2 years ago and you have to think that an update is due soon. Should be very interesting.





Great info about CF!


My pleasure!





Good to hear from you, been a while, best whishes and happy holidays to you and your family!


Thank you and best wishes to you and yours as well!

I hope to be participating more again, 2005 was a duesy that kept me _very_ busy...oftentimes doing things I'd've preferred not to!

Best,

Iver

Nicolas
01-01-2006, 03:50 AM
Dear Iver,


I understand completely!

It is like always, if you try to build something "on the cheap" you'll have more problems/troubles.

I never used/tried CF always our testserver is also running LAMP on a custom Debian build.

I knew some friends of mine are running WebObjects but no one is running CF.


Would be great to hear more about CF and it's capabilities/performance.
If you have some time please post more info, would be GREAT!


TIA

Nicolas